World Chess Champions before Magnus Carlsen.

World Chess Champions before Magnus Carlsen.


This is a video of great chess players that
became Classical World Chess Champions and also FIDE World Chess Champions that inspired
and impacted current generations of modern chess with their style of play, theories,
principles and lifestyle before present World Chess Champion, Magnus Carlsen. The FIDE world chess champions came up because
Garry Kasparov splitted from FIDE in 1993 which was the body governing the lineal line-up
of World Chess Champions and therefore resulted in two lines of world chess champions. The two titles was unified by a match between
current Classical World Chess Champion (Vladmir Kramnik) and FIDE World Chess Champion (Veselin
Topalov) in 2006, which was won by Kramnik. Starting with the list of Classical World
Chess Champions Wilhelm (later William) Steinitz was born
in Prague, 17th of May 1836 and died in New York, 12th of August 1900) was an Austrian
chess grandmaster who emigrated first to London, then to the USA. He was also called the Austrian Morphy after
winning the Vienna chess championship in 1861 with the score of 31 out of 31. He was the first undisputed World Chess Champion
and held it from 1886 to 1894. Steinitz won the title by beating Johannes
Zukertort in a match in 1886. He lost it to Emanuel Lasker in 1894. He also lost a rematch with Lasker in 1897. After his defeat by Lasker, Steinitz suffered
a nervous breakdown and was hospitalized in Moscow. He recovered for a time but fell sick again
and died extremely poor. Emanuel Lasker (24 December 1868 – 11 January
1941) was a German chess player, mathematician, and philosopher who was World Chess Champion
for 27 years. He was world chess champion from 1894 till
1921. In his prime Lasker was one of the most dominant
champions, and he is generally regarded as one of the strongest players ever. He finally lost the title to Capablanca in
1921. Lasker demanded high fees for playing matches
and tournaments, which aroused some criticism. He had seen how Steinitz’s life had ended
in poverty, and was determined to avoid this fate. The conditions which Lasker demanded for World
Championship matches in the last ten years of his reign were controversial, and prompted
attempts to define rules for championship matches. José Raúl Capablanca (Havana, Cuba, 19 November
1888 – New York, 8 March 1942) was a Cuban chess player who was World Chess Champion
from 1921 to 1927. Capablanca was a child prodigy with an astonishing
natural talent for the game. He was nicknamed “The Chess Machine” because
of his accuracy and speed of play. Alexander Alekhine (31 October 1892 – 24
March 1946) a russian chess player and the fourth World Chess Champion. He is the only World chess champion to die
holding the title. He was well known for his fierce and imaginative
attacking style. He was world chess champion between the years
(1927-1935 and 1937-1946) Machgielis “Max” Euwe (20 May 1901 in Amsterdam
– 26 November 1981 in Amsterdam) was the 5th World Chess Champion, from 1935 to 1937. He was a Dutch chess grandmaster, mathematician,
and author. He was not a full-time professional player;
he got his PhD in pure mathematics in 1926, and worked as a school and college teacher. He was made Professor of Mathematics in 1964. Mikhail Botvinnik (17 August 1911 – 5 May
1995) was a Soviet Russian grandmaster and three-time World Chess Champion between the
years (1948-1957, 1958-1960, 1961-1963) He was an electrical engineer, one of the
few chess masters who achieved distinction in another career while playing top-class
competitive chess. After his retirement as a player he coached
a few select pupils. They included three future World Champions
Anatoly Karpov, Garry Kasparov and Vladimir Kramnik. Vasily Smyslov (24 March 1921 – 27 March
2010) was a Russian chess grandmaster, and World Chess Champion from 1957 to 1958. He was a strong positional style and machine-like
technical player in the endgame, and also exhibit unique tactics in his games as well. Mikhail Tal (Riga, 9 November 1936 – Moscow,
28 June 1992) was a Soviet–Latvian chess player, a Grandmaster, and the eighth World
Chess Champion. He was nicknamed “The Magician of Riga”
because of his birthplace. He was world chess champion for one year from
1960-1961. Tal played in 21 Soviet championships, winning
it six times, a record only equalled by Botvinnik. He was a member of eight Soviet teams which
won the gold medal in chess Olympiads. He won the individual gold medal five times. Tigran Petrosian (Tbilisi, Georgia, 17 June
1929 – Moscow, 13 August 1984) was World Chess Champion from 1963 to 1969. He was born to Armenian parents, and brought
up in the capital of Armenia, Yerevan. Before his chess career, he was a street cleaner. He was known as “The Iron Tigran” due
to his almost impenetrable defensive playing style. Boris Spassky (born 30 January 1937 in Leningrad),
is a Soviet–French chess grandmaster. He was the tenth World Chess Champion, holding
the title from late 1969 to 1972. Robert James “Bobby” Fischer (March 9, 1943
– January 17, 2008) was an American-Icelandic chess Grandmaster and the eleventh World Chess
Champion. As a teenager, Fischer became well-known worldwide
because of his skill at chess. He won the American championship of 1963/64,
winning all eleven of his games. He was world chess champion from 1972 till
1975. Anatoly Karpov (born Zlatoust, Russia, 23
May 1951) is a Soviet and Russian chess grandmaster and former World Champion. He was official world champion from 1975 to
1985, played three more matches for the title from 1986 to 1990, he was FIDE World Champion
from 1993 to 1999. His tournament successes include over 160
first-place finishes. Garry Kasparov (born 13 April 1963 in Baku,
Azerbaijan) is a Russian chess grandmaster and political activist. He was born with the name Garry Weinstein,
and is partly of Jewish descent. Kasparov became the youngest non-disputed
World Chess Champion in 1985 at the age of 22. By any measure, he is one of the greatest
chess players of all time, and the highest-rated player before Magnus Carlsen. Vladimir Kramnik,born on the 25th of June
1975, is a Russian chess grandmaster. In October 2000, he defeated Garry Kasparov
in a match played in London, and became the Classical World Chess Champion. He was Classical World Chess Champion from
2000 to 2006, and was undisputed World Chess Champion from 2006 to 2007. Viswanathan Anand, known as Vishy, (born 11
December 1969) became World Chess Champion in 2007 and had his reign till 2013, which
he lost the title to Magnus Carlsen. He hails from India. Vishy is the oldest player in modern times
to become classical World Champion for the first time at age 37 when he won the title
in 2007. The list of FIDE World Chess Champions starting
with the first to attain the title, Anatoly Karpov (1993-1999)
Alexander Khalifman (1999-2000) Viswanathan Anand (2000-2002)
Ruslan Ponomariov (2002-2004) Rustam Kasimdzhanov (2004-2005)
Veselin Topalov (2005-2006). However, it’s also worth noting that there
were several unofficial champions before 1886, when the World Chess Championship first occurred,
such as the likes of Paul Morphy, Adolf Anderssen etc.

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