Shortest Game (Decisive) in World Chess Championship History – Anand vs. Gelfand – Game 8

Shortest Game (Decisive) in World Chess Championship History – Anand vs. Gelfand – Game 8


Hi everyone, it’s Jerry. This is game 8 from
the 2012 FIDE World Chess Championship match, or what might be better recognized as the
“Shortest Game in World Chess Championship History”. Viswanathan Anand has the white
pieces in this game, and is trailing three points to Boris Gelfand’s four. Let’s have
a look and see how things play out. Anand opening up with d4, Gelfand responding knight
f6. After c4 and g6, we saw the same story going on in games one and three of this match,
where in game one Anand replied knight c3 at this point, and in game three we saw f3.
f3 is once again the case only now in this game 8. In response to that in the game three
Gelfand played d5, but we’re having something much different. And that’s often denoted by
having a different pawn advance. In this case we’re seeing now c5, striking at this d4 point
immediately, and heading for a Benoni type of structure. White responding now d5, gaining
some space…taking away that natural…that classical c6 square from that queen knight.
Black playing d6 allowing that bishop to see, and ruling out any possibilities for a cramping
d6 advance by white. Gaining some space now in the center is Anand with e4. More development
on the black side, fianchettoing the bishop. Knight on g to e2, looking to eventually bring
the king knight over to the c3 square, and eventually this knight would like to make
use of the d2 square. This is another option to reorganize the pieces. It could be a bit
uncomfortable to get this king knight and king bishop out, seeing how this f3 pawn is
in the way of the knight f3 move. So black castles, knight-e to c3, and now this bishop
is ready to come out. And now knight to h5, looking to open up the position potentially
with f5, or even an e5 advance throwing a big question to the white side…do you capture
right away, or do you just allow it to remain closed? And then an f5 move is coming up very
soon. And we would have at that point then a position very reminiscent to a King’s Indian.
But it’s not so easy for white to make progress on the queenside, and that’s what typically
would happen if we’re working with the King’s Indian. Black will be looking to play on the
kingside, and white will be looking on the queenside. But with this pawn on c5, it’s
very difficult to break at. It’s very difficult to get play, or generate play on the queenside.
So following up we have bishop g5, anticipating this e5 advance, placing this pawn in a pin.
There will be no e5. Instead bishop f6 to neutralize this bishop’s influence on the
position. And after the bishops come off, we have this pawn recapturing…doubled pawns.
But it’s only temporary. Soon enough we’ll see f5, striking at this e4 pawn. Queen to
d2 observes these dark squares…h6. Primarily the f4 square move…it rules out any knight
f4 moves right away. And now we’re having f5. One thing that’s worthwhile to note is
if g4 is played and knight to f4, it seems very cozy right here. But after queen d2,
the knight is clearly running short on squares. And so a move like g5 now becomes a necessity.
But keep in mind that this is not the advance black wants to get in. It’s the f5 advance.
But that’s completely ruled out. And because f5 cannot be played, this bishop is essentially
biting on a rock. So this not the direction black wants to go in. Yes it have a nicely
placed knight on f4, but beyond that it’s not good. In fact you could view it as this
g5 pawn as just acting as a hook for an eventual h4 move. And with the exchange of those pawns,
the h-file is going to open up, and shortly thereafter we’ll have a case of opposite sides
castling, and this black king being in serious trouble. So in other words, not the way to
go. Should the move g4 be played, the knight would not do well to play to f4 but rather
basically fianchetto itself, and then look for an f5 advance. This is the main idea…try
and get in f5. So we don’t g4, instead it’s just queen to d2. And now with f5 striking
at e4, we have the exchange going on. Bishop recaptures, and now g4 coming with a fork
which is, ya know, you could get out of that. Black goes about it by first giving a check.
And we don’t have a block. We just have Anand now running over to the queenside. And black
now avoiding the loss of material with just a pawn takes either one of those minor pieces…first
grabbing that knight on b1, and Anand recaptures. Now this right here…this check by the rook
is maybe just a misstep right here because there is the possibility for first queen check
on h4, and then after the king moves, bishop takes, rook takes, and now react with let’s
say a knight g7 move. And this queen is very well placed to prevent any h4, h5 stuff, and
the opening up of the h-file. So that was definitely a possibility for black at this
point right here. But instead what we do have is the immediate rook check in response to
g4. King to d1, bishop takes knight, rook takes bishop, and now a miscalculation by
black. Queen to f6 simply did not see far enough. It is threatening queen takes pawn
with a fork right here, but white allows it. Pawn takes knight, queen takes pawn…we have
a fork. After king c2, queen takes rook…black is up material. But after the key move queen
to f2, black resigns in just seventeen moves. The queen is very close to just being dead
after a bishop move she’s clearly running out of squares. We have e4, f3…all of these
squares that I’m highlighting right here are all covered. And as soon as this bishop moves,
all of these squares are going to be covered, and the queen is dead. If there’s any type
of resistance in this position, it’s to sacrifice this knight on b8. There is the possibility
for knight c6. And if you move the bishop right away…well there’s going to be a knight
check followed by, let’s say, a queen to f3 and the queen is rescued. But what would occur
if knight c6 were even played…it basically just came down to after queen f2, black ends
up resigning right here. And it’s basically a position to resign no matter what because
after pawn takes knight, there’s queen takes pawn, and this knight right here…let’s just
say a rook move to the e5 square. A knight right here is well worth a rook. It’s invaluable.
A knight generally worth three points right here, but by not being able to be dislodged
from d5…again it’s invaluable. Very very powerful piece on that hole in the black position
on d5. This a hopeless position regardless of knight c6 being played at this moment right
here. But as it stands in this game, after just seventeen moves Gelfand is forced into
resignation, and this match at this point right here is now locked at four points each.
And we will see what happens in game 9. So that’s all for this video. As always, I hope
you got something out of it. Take care, bye.

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