National Premier Chess Championship 2015 Round 7 Highlights

National Premier Chess Championship 2015 Round 7 Highlights


In the seventh round, there were some very
beautiful games played. And I’d like to share my impressions on some of these, with you
so you can see the way on how these games were played and what really happened out there.
So basically after the moves of 1.d4 d5…this game was played between Vidit and Das in Round-7.
2650 rated Grandmaster with White who applied a pretty straightforward and simply formation.
Most people would even like to say that this is highly disadvantageous and it doesn’t really
look like there is way to go. But as a matter of fact, after continuing with Nf3 then Black
played Nd7, Bd3 and Black played dxc4, Bxc4, and b5. Now, basically expanding the position
on the queenside, with the exchange to follow, it’s a nice simple way to play. But on the
other hand, the real problem is that Black is really giving away a pretty important pawn
from the centre. And so what we found out is that after dxc4, essentially White plays
Bd3, Bb7 and a3. Ultimately, Black played a6, b4, a5. Now, I have to say that b4 was
a very interesting choice. This is not a move that is considered to be very easy to play.
Often, it’s actually quite vulnerable. But, it kind of provokes Black to start playing
on the queenside and then give White the ability to expand quickly on the centre, and somewhere
else where it would actually look he has got more possibilities to jump. After b4, basically
Black played a5 and White played Rb1, axb4, axb4, Bd6, 0-0. And of course after that variation,
Black castled and there was Qc2-e4. There is a really good way to follow up break in,
challenge the centre because the e5-move looks like an excellent way to follow up quickly.
So what we find out is that after e4, now e5 is really strong and Black has to play
e5. And essentially after that, White played Ne2. Now, I do want to mention that, generally
speaking, this strategy was not entirely correct. But sometimes to win a game, you really have
to go through different ways. What we see here is that White had to risk a little bit
so he can rearrange his knight from g3. And there is a bit of a challenge now coming directly
against the f5-square. So Black had to play g6. Black’s major mistake, I think, was that
after dxe5, Ng4…he kept the pretty good balance as White put his pieces on the kingside.
He really moved e6 in order to weaken the Black’s king’s position. And the position
was pretty balanced. White has sacrificed the pawn to get some initiative. Black just
keeping it all together. Now he sacrifices the pawn back so that he can block the queen
and he can think about the move of Raf8 or even Bc8. The biggest mistake came a couple
of moves later. The balance was held for quite sometime as we could learn that a lot of times,
in order to keep a good balance, all you really need to do is to just be ACTIVE. So Black
played Bc3, he even tried to challenge the White’s queen and it felt right. After Qa3,
White played f4 and this was the moment where Black lost it. See, keeping up a good balance
in the game is not always that simple. It’s not easy. It’s good to have that, but the
one thing that you need to do – is to look for a way to neutralize some of the opponent’s
strong pieces. For eg: a move like Bd4 would have been better. Perhaps, we can say, earlier,
after Qb3, instead of playing Bc3 which was not entirely necessary. In my opinion, a move
like Ra4 could help Black keep up some good activity – the rook will be very active. Be6
will come in the next moves when Black queen is more flexible. What advice I can give to
you is – if you want to avoid similar mistakes, one of the most important things, is try to
not to leave pieces hang. The c3-bishop was hanging. It just doesn’t quite work. Having
a certain piece on a square where it can be attacked or challenged, is a bad idea. What
we need to do is be very careful, and as much as possible, just try to stay away from letting
any motifs, any vulnerable pieces to hang. This is exactly what is happening in the position.
It’s not so much the problem with the piece. It is a significant issue with the principle.
The principle is very important. If you violate the principle, sometimes it really gets bad
and that is exactly what’s happening now. Right now, the problem with this move is exactly
the fact that after Bc3, there is going to be a really difficult problem in that position.
Now we see White was able to play Be3, he forces a serious challenge against the queen.
c3 is also on the line of our pieces and so we can threaten it. And it’s just getting
worse. Black played Qa3, f4, Ng4, Qxa3, Rxa3. And then we see Bc5, Ra2 and Bd1, there is
a strong possibility of Bb3. So Black simply lost the initiative and that’s some of the
most important things what you care about in these positions. You can care about a lot
of things. But what you care about, the most in these positions, is having good control
over how you pressure against your opponent / how you challenge him. The moment you lose
your initiative, is the moment where things go real bad and that’s exactly what happened
now. White has got Bb3 as a candidate, a strong possibility to attack in this way or in another,
as a matter of fact, and it’s just getting bad for Black every step of the way. It is
important to know that initiative in these positions is basically EVERYTHING! Losing
that INITIATIVE, is a terrible result and that’s why it’s getting too bad right now.
It’s just the fact that the initiative was lost and there is hardly any real ability
to hold the position together. I think it was brilliantly played by White. Some people
would say that this is sort of an equal position but the truth is that, it was played very
beautifully and there was no real complication that could happen out there. So, very well
played, very strongly advanced. After, f5 the game is pretty much done. There is nothing
that Black could do. His pieces are still on good places but there is no coordination
and they can’t really do anything. After f5, the game is very very bad. The whole thing
here is Black can’t do much. Even if he tries hard, it still doesn’t make any difference.
It is just bad game and difficult position in general. That was basically how the game
went. After gxf5, Nxf5,,,,White really relied on having his full command and good piece-potential
and place. He really did that and it was so beautiful. The cool thing of Nxf5 – White
was able to win material. But even if Black didn’t give it away, there is not just a whole
lot that he can do. We could look at the position and find out that it’s not just that Black’s
bad looking pieces. It’s also the fact that his king is not so safe. It’s the knight on
g4 that does coordination. Everything that simply shows that White is so much better
here. This was an incredibly interesting game because it shows so much about what a balance
is! So I’d like to bring about some of the key moments of the game. It is more or less
over. Perhaps White made a slightly worse move of f4. Re3 could have been played to
push the Black knight away. But this was good too. It pushed the knight in a different way
(it took it). But he didn’t want to move make a move of the knight because of the checkmating
possibilities. That’s what h4 was all about. It was a bit slow but it does its job. It
was a fine move. There are a couple of things I’d like to mention about this game that really
count. So starting from the beginning of the game, one of the things that you can really
learn from the game is how never to get provoked. Your opponent would try to provoke you in
this or that way, to begin something that you really don’t want him to begin. He will
do this in order to make you jump within whatever tactical sequences he wants you to jump, in
order to become more successful. You have to understand that jumping within tactical
sequences at an early stage of the game, is simply going to work against you. It’s a very,
very important rule. You should not be doing this. Even if you feel like you want to do
this, it’s just a bad idea. You don’t want to be going that way. I think that Black made
a mistake by starting all those possibilities and then the other important thing is, after
these tactical sequences that took place, Black kept a good balance, strong activity.
He didn’t care so much about the material. He tried to challenge the pieces but he left
White with an extra turn to really make things different. That was the move of Bc3 and you
need to understand that it is of an at most importance to pay strong attention towards
any (and I’m serious about that)…ANY kind of moves like this. Bc3 was not a horrible
move..not at all..It was a decent looking move which almost felt right. The problem
was it left the motive. We can say that this bishop was not a motive. And the other problem
that we found out is that it’s not about just the bishop that was a little bit of problem.
But it was after Be3, Qa3, f4..it’s just like every single piece that White utilized, was
to threat. And it was just not so good. So after f4, Black played Ng4 and the queens
were exchanged. Bc5 – so what we find is that there is a good shot against the rook. There
is a nice attacking possibility. After Ra2, Bd1, there was f5 which we see, is beautiful
and Nxf5, nice attack against the knight on g4. And a couple of Black pieces just sitting
on the backside and being terrible. It is just what we need to do. I think it was very
well played by White. Nh6+ – a great tactical sequence coming up instantly against the Black
king and that was very good. That was really, really well played. In the end, at the end
of the day, after that last move, obviously Black played Kg7 so the game was more or less
lost. It was very beautifully played in the direction in regard to what happened. Now
let’s go to another game. This game was an incredibly fighting game that was played between
2400 and 2600 players. The reason I’m saying it because it was an incredibly fighting game
because there are lots of things out there that just made it so beautiful to watch. So,
let’s see exactly what went right and what went wrong in that game so that we can learn.
Basically, it was Ruy Lopez opening……And then Nf6. Black was actually a pretty strong
player so he went on with Be7 and b5 forcing the White bishop to move away. And then what
we get to see is that White has to move Bb3, d6….Bg4 – now this is the main theory of
the line. You may not know it too well. It is a pretty straightforward line. The main
job, obviously, Black is having is to force a bit of attack against the knight on f3 and
also, of course, the main goal is, as this attack takes place, White is forced to move
his own pawn from d5. He just needs to do it after which Black could jump in and possibly
force his pieces towards the centre. So after this…there was Qc8…now his pieces are
focusing onto the queenside. So this is valuable. After Rfc8, Ne3 comes in. Now basically, after
that type of a move, Black played Rab8. So after a4 basically, Black plays along with
Nc4 to attack against e3. It makes a lot of sense. It’s a good challenge. And it directly
forces the attack against the knight. So it’s not that bad. Nf1, Nb6. I have to admit that
the move Nb6 was not working out too well. I don’t understand what was probably the reason
for which Black played it this way. But whatever it was, it wasn’t such a good idea. Don’t
go backward – that’s one of my major suggestions. Whenever I see a move of going back, we’re
losing a lot of control and lots of possibilities. I know that backward moves are not good. We’re
talking about the 2600 grandmasters. Usually, those players know when they can actually
make an exception and how to make one. But indeed, the problem is – you have to be really,
really careful of this type of move. So, you DON’T want to do it like that. What you want
to DO is to focus on b4 or even g6 would have been better. Still, makes sense to approach
the knight towards a4, can apply some extra tension on c3 and then of course, after that
move of Na4, we could see that there was Qc7 to challenge a5. After that, there was c4,
Nc5. That was alright. The knight came through, so it can attack. And then there was h5 which
was okay….And then h4. It is lovely to see how Black actually gained all that pressure
and the advantage within just a couple of moves that were really good. The control was
good, the stability was excellent. Now the activity of Black knight also looks brilliant!
So for the most part, everything, more or less feels fantastic. Rxb4…now something
went terribly wrong in a few moves. And it was right here when Black lost the INITIATIVE.
When you’re given the opportunity to attack, you have to take that very seriously because,
being able to attack, basically, Black had to go with the move of d5! The move d5, not
only helps with the challenge against the rook on e3 with Bc5, but it would have helped
Black to really acquire some tremendous possibilities towards his pieces. So that was a really,
really good move to play with. It was great to play like that. I have to tell you, everything
single time, when you’re given even the smallest bit of an advantage, that may not be permanent,
may not be enough so that you can win. You want to think of a way to transform it. You
want to think of a way to really breakthrough and open or attack. A move like d5 would have
helped exactly in that regard. After exd5, Bc5 – a challenge against the rook and so
many things like the knight on b6 is hanging. It’s just so good. And shortly after that
Black could have taken the initiative. Rd4, unfortunately, it didn’t create any bit of
a threat. And for this reason, White gained the possibility to play Bb2 and he had to
attack against the rook and then takeover….So Nf2, Black lost, not only material, but it
looks like a really hard game. It’s just that we don’t have the ability to set any real
threats. It’s like White is able to advance and bring his pieces closer and together.
So it’s not nice. Well Black played Qe7…Qf6 and now White played Rc4…and then Ng4. Shortly
after the couple of little exchanges that happened, White was also in a quite good position
to take the pawn and then we see that Black is terribly behind. Rb8 is coming in. It’s
kind of incredible, how out of a completely winning position, you can get very bad after
only a few slow moves which don’t fit in with the plan. You have to be careful. Everything
in open positions is about taking over the INITIATIVE. Black disregarded the point of
d5. And then, as a result, he lost quite a bit of the initiative. d5 would have been
an incredible move…maybe even Bd6 would have worked out quite fine. The idea in regard
to that, is to take on d5 next move and then after Bxb4, Bxb4, simplifying the position
would result very well for Black as he is already up by material. It’s just that he
could exchange the rooks and then he will be a pawn ahead. That was a very interesting
way to see how this mattered. Now Rd4 gave White the chance to take the rook back and
Black’s initiative, simply could not continue..could not work as he had no threats, not in anyway
to make the attack happen. So White was very good and he had plenty of solid resources
to fight back.

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