National Premier Chess Championship 2015 Round 10 Highlights

National Premier Chess Championship 2015 Round 10 Highlights


Hi! I’d like to begin with the
observation of round ten with a few very interesting games to take a look at. And first, was the rising talent Praneeth Surya who is playing Black against Shyam Sundar. This game was incredibly interesting and it shows
what really the energy of chess should be like. It was beautifully played, very instructive!
Really well set. And, I gotta say it was just such an incredible example. Let’s take a look and see what this is all about. After the moves 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6..Black played the Najdorf variation which was good. a6..and White played Be3, e5. So things look good at the moment. After e5, it pushes the knight
out of the way and as he’s basically forced to move that knight out.
So after Nb3, Be7 this has actually happened. And essentially, White played f3. Now speaking of the position here, I believe
White is doing his best in a way to follow the mainline. He wants to play g4 which is the most
common move. After that, of course there will be this opportunity to
launch, a kingside attack. And that’s what’s he’s really up to do. So after f3, Be6, Qd2, 0-0… a5 – very smart and innovative
way of playing this variation. Basically, what Black wants to do is to advance that pawn to a4-a3 and quickly move through so that he could
push the opponent back and and make him worry. This is very
important. Now, what White does is playing a4. And there was Nc6 which was quite interesting. After that, White played Kb1
of his own in order to get back. What Black played was the move of Nb4. g4, Rc8. I have to admit it was a pretty nice way of playing it. Basically, what Black wants to do is to set up as many pieces as possible around the queenside and it’s good looking. There’s also a nice challenge
against c3 and yes, for the most part, this looks good. Then White played Rg1. I think that was a little bit of a bad move. Not only that it is slow but the
real problem of Rg1 is that it doesn’t really do anything. That’s one of
these quiet simple moves was just doesn’t seem to be all that good in the first place. I think that didn’t have to be played. Perhaps, White could have just played h4 or maybe even continued with something like g5 most likely. That would have been probably better. But let’s see. He played Rg1 anyway and after that, d5, g5, Ne8. Some people would say that this is way too brave to play this type of move. And in a way, maybe it is. But the plan with d5 is ultimately to break through
and actually get all the necessary activity and steps that we need in order
to open each of the pieces. This is what you really want to do. In a position like
that, that makes a lot of sense. I do like to say that Ne8 was not a perfect move
because it felt more like a backward move. But anyway, exd5, Bf5 it is kind of clear what we’re getting from that. The bishop is getting
a pretty powerful position on the c2. He has the chance to challenge the opponent
quickly out there and in a way it is good to have it…good Bishop…strong
control and it looks fine. After that White played Rc1 and then b6, f4. White made one more mistake here. He should have probably continued with h4 and possibly after that, there was going to be the move h5 to advance
quickly down outside of the board. f4 was a
move that related to something entirely different and it’s not actually going at
all towards White’s plan in any way. See that’s very important! Whatever the idea is, one must always
think about advancing his plan. Just following ahead with moves that will help
him to advance the plan. When a move like that happens and it is pretty obvious
that it doesn’t advance the plan or the possibilities in any way. This is just bad and I think that this is exactly what’s coming in here. With that move in line, we see that after f4, Black played Nd6 and White is kind of waiting around and moving around with his
pieces. Black is doing something very purposeful on his own. He is really
bringing his forces as quickly as he can on the green side. So what we
could see is gonna happen is that after that type of move, he would just go and move ahead with something like…actually there are plenty of moves but there is Nc4. It’s going to be a nice challenge against the Queen as well as the b2-pawn in general. And it is good. Is it perfect? Perhaps, no. But it’s
just it’s a very strong play against White in this position. So White had to play fxe5, Ne4 and now he made another move that was bad. What White did here was to basically make his
queen go to d4 which simply allows Black to do so much. This makes very
little sense in my opinion. Why? Because it doesn’t seem to help. The
problem of White’s queen is that actually he’s allowing Black to stay with a
pretty powerful activity. We have a great looking queen…I guess White has calculated that there wouldn’t be anything so dangerous coming out of these pieces. But
the thing is he doesn’t even need to do that. The principle suggests that if
Black is left with those strong active pieces in this position, he will do or
deliver a lot of damage against White’s position. So that’s very powerful. And ok
let’s see. After continuing with the move of Qd4, Nxc3 and then of course, White has enough to worry about because of the challenges out there that are supposed to happen. Then there was bxc3, Nxd5 which was pretty awesome. After continuing with Bd2, there was Bc5 which instantly shoots at the White Queen..He has got weaknesses, extra problems and now even the queen is going to be really targeted and pushed back. So that actually forces an exchange which White just cannot avoid and that
exchange is really terrible. In every single way we can see that White just cannot escape but then exchange on other hand is pretty terrible because it gives Black the opportunity to open a file. A file that will most likely be devastating towards
White. There will be a strong attacking resource with moves like Rb8 and there are so much more to come. It was very bad. It’s hard to explain
exactly what White was thinking in this type of position. But Black took over the initiative which basically means that he’s winning. He took over the initiative..
creating some really fast and efficient threats against White. So White did Queen Qf2 in this position and then after continuing with this move…well let’s
see.. there is c4 to happen. Very good looking move! Beautifully played and just in line with
exactly what we’re looking for. It’s perfect. What happens after the move that comes here. White had to play Re1. He doesn’t have that many options really. He just had to do this. So after Qd7, Black’s position is obviously winning. It is a clearly better situation in which Black has
a total command over to the b-file which you can easily controlled by setting up
his rook there. White’s king is in a bad game. He has no way of actually moving
out in this moment. So there was Rb8 and suddenly a lot of strong movies coming
against White’s king. I cannot say that he has the same quality type of position. So he played Kc1 in that moment in order to move the King out there but then there was Qxa4 which was perfect and we can understand why this is getting bad. Obviously, queen is coming. This was a beautiful game that teaches us three very critical principles. The first is about the SPEED of the ATTACK. A lot of people don’t actually understand how speed works and
the truth is that speed is extremely important. You have to understand that
whatever it is that you’re doing you you have to do it as quickly
as possible and with no delay. Because if you delay
it, it could get bad. So it’s very important that you actually act quickly! The second very important thing that you
have to remember is fight for initiative! The material doesn’t matter that much.
What really we need to do is focus on attacking against the opponent, pressuring,
taking on the initiative which would be very very useful. When you do that, the
rest is less significant in a more dynamic, in a more tactical positions. So black did that beautifully and most of all, here is something to learn from the White
perspective and this is…NEVER underestimate the power of the strong and advanced pieces. Because when the stronger advanced pieces are there, far advanced
inside one’s position and dangerous..it can do a lot of damage. Just by
sitting there, it could be very scary and also be very very careful. That was all I’d like to mention about this position. It was very good game. So let’s take a look at other interesting games that were played in this round. There was a game that was
played as a matter of fact between a Grandmaster Sethuraman and Swapnil. This game started with Sicilian.. Bb5 and c4 – a very intriguing system.
The main idea of White is in case Black exchanges, White will be taking away good square of c6 and will be taking some
more control out there and so essentially that’s just a very valuable
idea. After continuing with this move then basically Black played Nf6 in order to step out of the way. So it looks good and so what happens in this position is after the move
Nf6, there was g6… So basically there was d4, cxd4, Nxd4. From what we could see right now is that the knight is beautifully
placed in the center. The majority of White’s pieces don’t have that privilege
and so Black is gonna be perfect looking with a control and further on
with the ideas of Bg5 and Qd2. Black was struggled. I mean a lot, in this position. So Bg7, Be3… Some will argue that this exchange really does not give White as much control. Well
maybe, it doesn’t. But on the other hand what we see is that it provides a little
more time. And time, in these situations could be quite critical. So I have to say that
it’s not such a bad idea to play. Bxc6, bxc6 and then White played c5 – a very smart combination which is mainly directed towards breaking White’s pawn structure. It looks interesting. After the
move of c5, what we get to see if Black plays dxc5, he will most likely lose it. After Nb3 But the problem is not he is going to lose the pawn. The problem comes from the fact that Black’s
pieces are simply gonna come through..it will move in and they will become incredibly dangerous
just the way they come forward. And so that was a very very powerful activity in
this case, I have to say. After Qb8, what really did happen in the game? White just decided to move with Nb3, a5 and 0-0. Now I wouldn’t say
what happened in here with… Nb3 was great! I do wanna say tha
it’s a move that just sets our pieces backward. And in that regard he just don’t want to be playing backward. Backward
moves are often very easy for your opponent to handle. That’s why it didn’t
work. Maybe a move like 0-0..could have even sacrificed the pawn. But in that case, here if Black captures b2, we can play Qd3 and then eventually, here..Rfd1. I think White could fight for the initiative. Now obviously the Grandmaster fought for a whole lot longer
in the game. He decided that it may be a bit too risky
that’s why he chose even more passive move. But yes. Actually after continuing with Nb3, Black played a5.. the game
looks more or less equal. It’s not like much worse..not much better. It looks fine and then after Qc2, Bxb3..and in that moment, what we
see is that White played with axb3. d5 and Ra4. Yes, getting a little bit more stability on the line.. especially towards the e4 pawn..seems
fair enough. If Black exchanges, then he is going to, ultimately, like re-capture which is not bad. And then after Nxe4, Nxe4..it looks alright. It’s a rather qual position but not drawish in any case. I’d like
to mention that. It is just a challenging one…complex situation in which White has
good open file and direction towards Black. And Black has to stay a little bit
behind at least at this particular moment. So it is not bad or dangerous to
play here. After Bf4…White now relies on a specific, very useful plan. What is supposed to be the right way to plan here? There are so many good moves and things to do. So exactly what should we do While that seems to be a complex
question to answer, I’d like to say that often the
intentions of a certain position should depend basically on what is the major goal.
That’s why I say that before we set up a plan, we need to ask ourselves very
concretely what is the actual goal in a given position? And I suppose we can very
easily realize that the major goal for White over here is eventually, or must be
to find a way of bringing his pieces together so that when you
ultimately gets to coordinate them, the coordination of the pieces is gonna
guarantee for future threats and important possibilities. So in that
regard what we find is that after Ra8.. So, White is able to, first, set the coordination between the two rooks together. It is a good
coordination. With a5 being under some pressure on the line and the
majority of the Black pieces just sort of tied down and little behind, I don’t
think White has got anything to worry about. It just fits in. This position looks really good. So what’s coming out in this type of position? After the move of Ra1, obviously
Black is a bit more behind..he is sort of died down to a defense
which is not very convenient. And so this gives White some extra
chances. So what’s going to happen next? Ra1, Ra6, Bc7 – beautifully played! A great
Bishop attacking against the Black pawn and tying some of his most
valuable pieces down on the defense.. looks great! The difference what
really makes the position very different and stronger, maybe we could even say it for White, is the pieces. Black is definitely very much behind out there
and down in development, White is enjoying open files, has attacking resources and variety of different threats. So this is
good. When Black played the move of Qb7 White played Bb6 which was good. And yes, it feels right..it’s a good stability..nice control! And we’re able to even more forward..g3..Qc7..It was an excellent move. Rad4…and now White emerges victorious not because of something
special but just because well, White has everything! He has got the rooks, the passed pawns, the tremendous power that’s available out there! And Black has not got any of this. So just speaking of the position in terms of like how it looks it becomes
clearly superior for White to play this position. I think that this game presents a very instructive example what space and peace activity means. And even
if you do feel that, at a certain point, you lost your momentum, you can always get back get it back by simply improving the coordination of your pieces! I feel
like White really did a great job with the rooks and the bishop. And so in that
regard, he was able to exploit some of Black’s mistakes like Ra6 that didn’t
work. Black should have played e5 or e6 and Be7. So he was able to exploit that, in order to get
superiority between his pieces and just do so much better! So it was an
instructive game…good example.. just a couple of valuable points to learn from
this game as to how you should be thinking yourself!

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