Meet the Bishops!

Meet the Bishops!


Now that we’ve learned the rook I think
it’s time we double your knowledge don’t you? Let’s learn our second
piece, which is the bishop. A lot of kids think the bishop
has his mouth open because he’s ready to eat some pieces. Before we can do some
eating we have to set the table first by teaching you
how the bishop moves! Quite simply, the bishop moves
along the “diagonals” of the chessboard and I see two really long
diagonals that the bishop is occupying. Notice, every square of a
diagonal is the same color. In this case, the white squares. If the bishop begins the
game on the white squares he must stay on the white squares. Kind of like the shoes on your feet. Whatever color they are
today they’re going to be the same color tomorrow
unless you step in some mud! Let’s move the bishop along
and the bishop can move one square if it wants to,
or much like the rook it has the decision it can
go further and go two squares or all the way to the side of the board. Of course, you can’t go
off the side of the board that wouldn’t be possible! The bishop can also
choose these four squares and the bishop can go backward as
long as he moves along the diagonals. We’ve got three more squares
and if you were to count really quickly the number of arrows that
FunMasterMike drew, you’d get to 13. Recall the rook was able
to go to 14 different squares but the bishop is less powerful
than the rook for a different reason. The bishop can only ever
touch one color of the board. The rook can touch both! So, most of the time we think the rook
is a little more powerful than the bishop. Let’s get to moving the bishop.
Let’s move the bishop two squares. Ok, now move the bishop one square. Now, we’ll go all the way down
the board. We’ll stop on this square. Then we can go to the square, d1
and we can keep on moving. I think it’s time to learn
how the bishop does some eating! I’ve magically added a couple
of black rooks to the chessboard. Which one can the bishop
run into on the next turn? Well, that’s actually
a pretty easy question with bishops. Because the bishop’s on a white square. Only one of these rooks
is on a white square so, unless I’m lying to you
it’s gotta be that rook and in order for the bishop to capture,
all it does is move diagonal staying very carefully
on those white squares. You land on top of the black piece
and you take it off the board. Just like with the rook, when you
make a capture you have to stop. You can’t keep going. That makes it impossible to
capture more than one piece at a time. Now, if we wanted to capture
this other black rook, well actually, it would be impossible
even if I gave that bishop an unlimited number of moves. The bishop could go one
square and then down two squares and the bishop could
dance all around the rook but as long as that rook stays still
the rook might as well be invisible. The bishop cannot “see” the rook. In fact, if you recall,
back to our lesson on the rooks the minute Black gets a move,
the black rook will just come over and capture the bishop. I think the next thing we should do is
play a little “rook versus bishop” game. I’m gonna call it “Tom versus Jerry”. Tom versus Jerry is
a story of a cat chasing a mouse. Does the cat ever get the mouse? Well, I’ll let you watch the
cartoon and decide, but in our game we’re going to have the rook be the cat. The bishop’s gonna be
the mouse and as we all know cats like to chase mice. So, let’s have this black rook come
all the way down to the square, a1. And as you can see
the rook is about to capture the bishop. Now, it’s time for Jerry
to run away, but you know what? Sometimes, you do not
want to go as far as is possible. For example, could
the bishop travel all the way to a6? Yeah, it could, but if it did
the rook would just back up because rooks go in straight
lines and would capture the bishop. So, what I would advise
you to do in this position is move the bishop
to a different square. Sometimes, a shorter
number of moves is actually better. So, we’re gonna move
the bishop just two squares and again, let’s have Tom chase Jerry. The bishop’s in danger! But we’re gonna move
diagonal and let’s go to the square, g6. Ok! The rook can now
attack the bishop again. Let’s have the rook go sideways to g1.
The bishop’s in danger. Bishop runs away
again and you know what? This doesn’t really happen in
the cartoon, but let’s just say the cat is having a bad day and
travels up the board but stops on g6. What is Jerry gonna do? Yeah, Jerry can actually catch
Tom by going diagonal landing on top of the rook and
remember, when you make a capture you have to stop. Two more quick notes about the bishop then it’ll be time
for you kids to start solving! I’ve added a few more
pieces to the board to show you that when you start a chess game
you’re actually going to get two bishops one on the light squares
and one on the dark squares. And, your bishops can
never run into each other because they’re always going
to operate only on their own color. That’d be like having a left shoe
of one color and a right of another color and while that might be
a bad fashion statement it would resemble a chess game! And the last thing
to talk about, ChessKids, is what happens when
you run into your own piece? For example, if this bishop
on g6 wants to capture the rook… unfortunately,
your own rook’s in the way. In chess, you can’t
jump over your own rook (even though it kinda
looks like I just did it). You have to stop and land on
the square right before you get to it. So, this bishop could only
move to the square, f5, that’s it! A better option would be
to move your rook out of the way and that opens the diagonal. If Black doesn’t see what’s coming then you can capture
the black rook on the next turn. And truly, the bishop
will have eaten another piece! I think we’ve had a full meal and
now it’s time for you to get solving!

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