Justin Lockett: Chess as Critical Thinking

Justin Lockett: Chess as Critical Thinking


[MUSIC] Well, chess involves critical thinking in the fact that there’s more than one way to play a chess game. Once you get
out of the opening, that’s a more theoretical part of the game, the options
are open to you to how you want to play the position. Now there are tons of
different ways that you could attack middle games, and that’s why I like to
call it the gray areas of chess. That’s who you really get to see one, who you
are as a player and two, who your opponent is as a player. You got to see
how they attack the position. Are they’re doing it wisely
or they’re making mistakes? Let’s say you’re an aggressive player; that means
the aggressive players like to attack anything in sight. They like to capture
as many pieces as possible as fast as possible.
So if black was playing this position right here, he might go right ahead and
capture on d4 and say the Queen would capture on d4, black wouldn’t even think
about retreating his queen. He would just go ahead and capture white’s Queen as well.
And when the Knight recaptures here on d4, he’d immediately play check and start
attacking white’s Queen white’s King. He wouldn’t think about retreating his pieces
at all. He’s gonna play moves that get him the fastest results possible. Now,
let’s say we have a more positional player. Now a positional player doesn’t
worry so much about attacking but instead they want to build up their
arsenal. They want to build up their position as much as possible. So instead
of capturing here on d5, instead they might just go ahead and play
a Bishop b4 check. To defend their King, white might play Knight c3 — and still we’re
going to ignore the pawn here. We don’t care about capturing it. We’re gonna go
ahead and play Knight f6 and develop another piece. We’re gonna get all
our pieces involved and we’re gonna develop our position and this is
perfectly fine. Black doesn’t have to capture
material right away. He can instead choose to invest in his future, and he can attack
later down the road. So, the reason chess involves critical thinking is because you have to decide which style works best for you and which way you
want to attack the position

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