Joint Strategies

Joint Strategies


– [Voiceover] Okay,
well, welcome everybody. You have joined the
session, Joint Strategies, how does sexual and
domestic violence prevention better leverage local health, justice, and education community sectors? And I see folks from all over with all different types of weather. I’m actually calling from DC where I say it’s hot and disgusting, sorry if you enjoy
muggy, very hot weather, and I see folks from North Carolina, and California, Oregon, and San Diego, I’m sure the weather is lovely there, and all sorts of places, so thank you all for joining us today. Again, for the session Joint Strategies how does sexual and
domestic violence prevention better leverage local health, justice, education, and community sectors. I’m Ashley Maier with PreventConnect. My colleagues who are joining me today and are helping to backup this session, Abby Sims is here as well as Deena Fulton, so I wanna thank them for joining as well. PreventConnect is an online
community of practice focused on the prevention of domestic, sexual, dating, and
related forms of violence. As some of you may already,
know we have a website that has lots of blogs,
lots of information, and podcasts, of course, web conferences, and there are recordings
and upcoming registration. We have an eLearning site, we have a wiki, and we have a lot of social media. So, let’s talk a little bit
about our technology today. For closed captioning,
you can select the stream on the top right of your screen. Everybody, if you could go
ahead and raise your hand, it’s a little cut off on this one, but it’s right over here,
I’m just circling it, so that is what you can do if you are wanting some attention. We’ll check in with you likely
through our private chat, so you can look to the right
of your screen is the chat, there’s a chat that says public, we’ll go ahead and we’ll check in with you on that private tab right next to it. We really encourage you to
go ahead and use the chat. It’s a great way to share information, to connect with your colleagues, and to ask questions and make comments, and we’ll definitely be using that today. So, thank you for raising your hands. I saw most of you are aware of that function and able to use it, you can go ahead and try
to lower your hand as well. We’ll see if that works
and then in a second, we will lower all hands. The slides today, if
you’re unable to see those at any time today, you
can click Today’s Slides on the top of your screen, it’s right about in the
middle, slightly to your right, that will get you back
to the slides today. We will ask some polling
questions in just a second and I’ll tell you how to
do that as I’m asking them, and the phone lines tend
to have the best audio. If anybody’s having issue
with audio over the phone, we encourage you to call in, that number is on the
top left of your screen as well as with your passcode. Can we ask that folks just use regular web conference guidelines, just nice respectful communication? We really do encourage, if you’re gonna do
one-on-one communication especially if you wanna
share your information and you don’t want everybody
to have your phone number, your email, go ahead and
use that private chat. It’s a great way to have
more one-on-one conversations and if you’re having any other issues, you can call iLinc technical support at 800-799-4510. PreventConnect is a national project of the California Coalition
Against Sexual Assault, sponsored by US Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. The views and information
provided in this web conference do not necessarily
represent the official views of the US government, CDC, or CALCASA. Let’s go ahead and ask
those polling questions. I am asking a question right now, hopefully you can all see it. What best describes your
organization or agency? So, go ahead and click on that screen and are you from sexual violence agency, domestic violence, Dual,
college or university, K-12, State Territory/Federal
Public Health Department, or just other federal
government, tribal organization, child abuse, HIV/STI, reproductive health, mental health, health
care, LGBTQ organization, community-based organization,
and faith-based, military. We have a lot of choices here, criminal justice, funder
foundation, or other. So, click on that screen,
I’m gonna go ahead, I’ll share the results in just a second, let me give you more time to click. If you’re are other, please go ahead and type that into the text chat. What are you if you’re other, ’cause we have 5%, so where
are you from if you’re other? Let’s see. I see State University of
Victim Advocacy program, so that is Melissa, welcome. Oh, we have a hospital, we have Dual DV, and so it looks like we have quite a bit of folks from sexual violence and domestic violence organizations, but we also have from
public health departments, colleges and universities. We have from specific
issues like child abuse and child maltreatment-based organizations and a couple, well, one,
likely, healthcare, military, so we welcome you all, we welcome
the educators in the room, looks like we have a
youth services here also. Thank you all for joining us. I’m going to withdraw this question and I’m going to ask you another question that is actually not
showing up for me right now, so why don’t you go ahead if you are, here, we’ll do a quick feedback. For whatever reason
that is not showing up, the question I was gonna ask you, so let’s do and I’ll have to
type this into the text chat, so I put a feedback
poll there and this is, have you been to a web conference before? So, A equals no, B equals
two to three times, and C equals more than three,
so go ahead and do that, there’s no need to use D, but let’s see. Oh, it looks like, wow,
it’s all yellow on those, so it looks like we have folks who have been here many, many times, more than three times,
so welcome you all back. Also, welcome those who have
been here a couple of times, and looks like there’s just a small sliver of those of you who
this is your first time on a web conference, on a
PreventConnect web conference, so we welcome you all. Oh, yeah, and there’s a lot more Cs it looks like in there, in the text chat, go ahead, you can answer
that on the left bottom side of the screen, you can just
click the answer there, you don’t have to put
it into the text chat, but overwhelmingly, it
looks like we have folks who are coming back and we
definitely, definitely welcome those of you who are a bit newer to the web conference format. So, I’m gonna go ahead,
oh, I guess I don’t need to withdraw the question
because it wasn’t there. Okay. I’m gonna close that poll because we’re many other, oh, let me share the results with you first, so you can see what that looks like, and that’s it for the technology today. So, a little bit more about PreventConnect and then we’ll get onto our
exciting concept for today. We focus on, as I said, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual violence, and related forms of violence. We really wanna look at
violence across the lifespan and we’re interested in preventing violence before it starts. So, we wanna connect to other forms of violence and oppression,
we wanna connect those dots. We really, really are here as a vibrant community of practitioners. That’s not the best line,
but that was my yellow line. We’re really interested
and that’s what we do in these web conferences,
we find the text chat very helpful with that, is we
connect you all to each other. It’s about connecting to
your fellow practitioners. We have one more web conference coming up in this series today. It’s the July 9th one, it’s on the screen, and then on August 13th,
we’re gonna be closing it up, talking about Closing the Loop, increasing investment and sustainability for sexual and domestic
violence prevention and after that we will announce our new series for the next year of really wonderful and
exciting web conferences, so stay tuned for that, and the registration for
Closing the Loop is open. I’ll go ahead and put
that in the text chat when I am done with this introductory information for you all. Let’s get into it. Joint Strategies, how does
sexual and domestic violence prevention better leverage local health, justice, education, and community sectors? That’s an important
topic with connections, again, what we’re really interested in. Today, our objectives are about identifying potential partnerships
that are cross-sector. We wanna utilize tools that can guide this collaboration process and we’re gonna list
those joint strategies that are ripe for partnership. So, with that, I’m gonna bring in Benita. Benita is from Prevention
Institute, our great partners in these web conference series that we do. Hello, Benita. – [Voiceover] Hi, so my program for preventing community violence, so it’s great to have this opportunity to facilitate a conversation
across different forms of violence and really learn together, so thank you for the warm welcome, Ashley, and from the PreventConnect audience. So, yeah. I mean, I think already
the dynamic text chat really reminds me again of what
a unique community you are, so it’s such an honor to be here. I’m joined by Casey Castaldi
and Alexis Captanian here who are working behind the
scenes to make this all happen. If over the course of the next 90 minutes, you have problems with the
slides or the phone lines, feel free to start a
private chat with Ashley or with Prevention Institute, and we’ll also be sending all
the slides after the webinar to everyone who registered, not to worry, let’s just focus on the conversation and really just get into learning together about what those multi-sector
partnership really look like and how do you start engaging folks on the ground where you work. Before launching into the content, I wanna make sure we’re
all on the same page in terms of approach. Ashley mentioned already
the focus of PreventConnect is really on preventing
violence before it starts, that means always
returning to this question. What can be done to prevent violence from occurring in the first place? Also, the strategies to sort this all this together in conversation, what does really primary
prevention look like when it comes to sexual
and domestic violence? There’s so much value, in my mind, in the PrevenConnect web conferences in part because you guys really focus on the up front
prevention, the strategies, the actions you can take
before violence has occurred, and especially with violence, I think there’s a tendency to
default into these other parts of the prevention continuum on the screen. You really wanna intervene
with there’s a crisis, we need to screen for violence, we need to help survivors heal, yes, those are all
support important things that have to happen and at the same time, we also need to invest
in up front strategies. This is that sort of left end
of the prevention continuum that has the greatest
potential to reduce violence, but that also gets the least attention, and I think that’s why
we spend so many webinars really talking about the up
front end of this continuum. What can we do to prevent
violence before it even occurs? The Institute of Medicine
recently changed their name to be National Academy, but
I don’t think their position on this has changed either. They’re really saying it’s
not reasonable to expect that people will change
their behavior easily when so many forces in
the social, the cultural, the physical environment are
conspiring against such change. Violence does not occur in a vacuum, it’s really about this
whole mix of factors. So, to really make a
dent in rates of violence and to change norms,
we have to really work at the environment, really
shaping those environments because that’s where people
are navigating every day, really sort of being shaped and making choices in that environment, and if we shape the environment, we can really shape behavior, and that will result in
improvements in health and safety. So, today, what I really want to focus on is to share some findings with you from the Defending Childhood Initiative and then explore what does
that mean for us as a field. Defending Childhood is
a federal initiative to reduce children’s exposure to violence and there are eight
sites across the country that are looking at
various forms of violence, child abuse, intimate partner
violence, community violence, and then Multnomah County,
which is a guest today, they’re looking at trauma more generally, and Prevention Institute is
one of the technical assistance providers for this initiative. I recently interviewed
a bunch of practitioners working across sectors on this issue and I want to start by asking the audience some of the same questions
that I asked them. So, for starters, what are
the benefits of working with other sectors to prevent
sexual and domestic violence? You could use your text chat and type kind of what are the advantages of working with other folks on this issue? This webinar is really
about joint strategies, engaging other sectors in the
work, so why are you here? Like what do you see as the value? What are you hoping to learn? I already see…
– [Voiceover] So, go ahead… – [Voiceover] I see Kristen’s
talking about shared funding. Excellent, kind of
pulling resources together to have a greater impact. Sharing data is so important. Reducing duplication of efforts. It’s actually when you
partner with other folks, you’re more efficient,
you’re able to address things with fewer resources. What else do we have? New idea, Janny, wonderful. Shared expertise. Greater reach, sort of when
you partner with other folks, kind of tapping an even broader network than you would’ve otherwise
been able to reach on your own. Networking with some of our shared ideas. I really like that idea from Rachel because it really brings to the forefront the power of a learning community and kind of when you– – [Voiceover] And Benita… – [Voiceover] Oh, go ahead. Yeah, that’s fine. – [Voiceover] Benita, I
really like what Julie says about multi-component programming and addressing the
intersections of the community. I like that word
multi-component for programming. – [Voiceover] For sure, I
mean, so often people ask like “What’s the program that I need “to put in place to prevent violence?” And I always have to sort
of reel them back and say, “It’s not gonna be one program, “it’s gonna be lots of
different strategies “and activities that are
all working in tandem,” so that’s great, Julie, that you’re really bringing that out. Better and more better, excellent, Sarah. That sounds a lot like our
executive director, Larry Cohen, actually, he’s always
saying things like that. Evermore, evermore. All right, wonderful. I mean, a lot of what you guys have raised are really echoing the findings from Defending Childhood initiative. Really the most efficient way to address complex issues like violence
is to work together, and one of the things I really like that came up in the interviews was improve trust and
credibility with the community. When you work across sectors, you’re able to be more effective
and have a greater impact and really serve optimally the community and in that in turn, the
community will turn around and be like, “Local
government and this network “of nonprofit is working for me” and that’s really gonna
improve trust and credibility, and we get even more collaboration
and stronger partnership. So, that was definitely
one of the findings from this project was that practitioners recognize the value of
multi-sector collaboration and their participation in this webinar is a testament to that,
there’s value in this and people wanna know how to make it work, but another major was
that it’s hard to do, that systems are not
designed for prevention and they’re not designed
for collaboration either. So, even when you have people at the table willing to work together, the systems, the bureaucracy, like so
often they get in the way when they don’t need to be. So, one more question for you guys is in your experience or
from stories you’ve heard, what are some examples of systems get in the way of working together and what are some of those barriers to multi-sector collaborations in terms of process or in the
way organizations are set up? Ashley, I don’t know
if you have any stories that you wanna share while people type their answers into the text chat box. – [Voiceover] Oh, yeah, I mean,
I don’t wanna specifically call anyone out, but I will say, I mean, a lot of time we
haven’t different funders who have competing priorities
and that creates a barrier because we can necessarily work together on certain funded projects as it comes to having different deliverables. – [Voiceover] Right, I
see Heather talks about competition for funding or
agencies being territorial, restrictions, and it’s
hard to communicate, that’s been coming up again
and again in the text chat. In one of the stories that I
heard from a city employee is in order to speak to your
counterpart in a different agency, you both have to get approval
from your supervisor’s boss and for people two levels
above you to agree, like it’s okay for you to have a– – [Voiceover] Mhmm. – [Voiceover] Which I find so ridiculous. – [Voiceover] Right. – [Voiceover] Like it
doesn’t even make any sense and yet that’s the reality that so many practitioners are working in, that makes this kind of effort difficult. So, thank you everyone for sharing. The challenges of multi-sector work and the barriers in the way, we’re really hoping that this session will give you concrete advice for how you can both sort
of work within the systems, like find workarounds
within those structures, but also to really figure out how do you change the system itself, like how do we alter the
ways things are set up, so it’s actually much easier
to collaborate across sectors. So, today we’ll be hearing examples from Pennsylvania and
Multnomah County in Oregon, to hear how are they doing this and hopefully, you’ll be
inspired to recruit other sectors to prevent sexual and domestic violence, and really start figuring out
how do we change the system, so that this is easier for
everyone to do on moving forward. So, I’m gonna introduce our
three guests right off the bat. Abdul Hafeedh bin Abdullah
is a community health worker, a health promotion practitioner, and a faith community leader,
so he wears a bunch of hats. His work really focuses on building healthy, thriving communities and he works at that intersection of social justice, preventing violence, and holistically
cultivating self-efficacy. He and Erin Fairchild both work at the Multnomah County health department and Erin has worked with communities impacted by violence and
trauma for the past 16 years and she specializes in
childhood exposure to violence. She leads the Defending Childhood
work in Multnomah County and she believes everyone
has a role in making our communities just
compassionate and loving and I think that we all in the audience agree with her on that. Her background is in grassroots
domestic violence movements and child welfare and
anti-oppression work, and she knows a ton about
trauma-informed practices and gaining school systems, and
so many other topics related to children’s mental health. So, welcome to Abdullah and Erin. We also have on the line, Fern Gilkerson with Pennsylvania Coalition
Against Domestic Violence. She develops training,
tool kits, programs, on health, domestic violence,
and dating violence. She manages the Project
Connect 2.0 initiative which is a network of six
sites across the state where local multi-sector coalitions are working to prevent and intervene on abuse in adolescent relationships. So, we really invited Fern
to speak with us today about how out of those six sites have partnered with schools
and with health professionals and she brings to this
work a mix of experience. So, she’s dealing with
domestic violence prevention, advocate of birth doula,
women studies instructor, and she has 26 years in social justice, so I’m so glad to have
her on the line with us. Welcome, Fern. – [Voiceover] Hi, thank you for having me. – [Voiceover] Of course. So, Fern and I are gonna chat for a bit and as usual, I encourage you
to type questions as we go in the text chat box, we’ll
be sure to revisit those in a few minutes once
we’ve gotten started. So, Fern, I mentioned
these six local coalitions as part of your intro. Can you tell us a little bit
more about Project Connect and why these community
coalitions came together? – [Voiceover] Sure, absolutely. So, Project Connect is national
project in the second round funded by Futures Without Violence and Office on Women’s Health. There are three different
sort of categories that we could apply for when
we applied for the grant, so we chose the adolescent
health portion of it. When we were thinking through
how we wanted to do this, we identified medical
advocates in the state as sort of a strong
contingency of experts, domestic violence experts,
that we could leverage their knowledge and their background and the network that we already had, and then we thought about prevention and how PCADV is really,
sort of really committed to prevention and we felt
that engaging school nurses as sort of our core
piece to our application and in the project crux
would really make sense in pulling together the prevention piece and sort of the health promotion piece. So, we– – [Voiceover] So, what was your vision for the school nurses
in terms of day to day? How are they gonna be incorporating messages about healthy
relationships into their work? – [Voiceover] Well, what
we had asked them to do was be the point person for
health promotion in the schools. We had asked them to deliver
healthy relationship messages in do the primary
prevention piece from there and then we asked them
to be a point person for dating abuse in the school and someone would refer students who came to them with issues out to domestic violence and
family planning partners. With adolescent relationship abuse, it really merges the sexual assault, domestic violence and family issues, so we felt that it was really important to have school nurses,
domestic violence advocates, and family planning clinics
as a core partnership. – [Voiceover] That sounds great. I mean, it sounds like
partnering with the school sites was an essential piece of being able to reach out to school nurses, like that was sort of
one of the first steps and school reps tell me all the time that they’re always asked to add on to what they’re already doing, and so what where some of the challenges that the sites encountered and the local coalitions
in overcoming resistance and really bringing schools
around to this idea? – [Voiceover] Sure, so
what we had to do first was find domestic violence programs that were already connected to schools and we wanted that
relationship to be in place because we really just needed that, we need to have that in place to kind of hit the ground running. So, whenever we had that in place, we connected with the nurses and it was usually the prevention educator that made that connection, the medical advocates weren’t
necessarily already connected, and it made a lot of sense to the nurses to kind a jump in right away
and be that point person. They were really excited about it, but they did run into challenges, and some of those were privacy, the expectation that that there
would be some private time to engage each student that came in because the messaging was
meant to be universal, it was meant to be delivered, that prevention messaging
meant to be delivered to every student that walked in because we felt that it was important to the community and social change aspect. So, really we’re used to engaging girls and educating them about dating violence, but this took a different twist, the more primary prevention twist, where we wanted to
deliver the same messages to anyone who came in regardless of their relationship status,
sexual orientation status, gender, what have you, it was
every student that came in was to receive the messaging. So, that was sort of a change in paradigm and we were thinking about
how to engage students. Other issues were, as you said,
you mentioned this earlier, learning each other’s
systems and services. We had to really think
about maybe the schools do things really differently than domestic violence systems
or family planning and how can we cross those
systems and cross-pollinate, that took some training,
cross training work, to learn about what each other was doing. We kinda thought we
knew, but really didn’t. – [Voiceover] Right, so it sounds like you leveraged existing relationships. So, when a domestic violence program already had a connection to the school, tapping that person who
understood the school system to reach out to the school nurses, so that there was already
sort of credibility and a sense that this is
really in the interest of the school and the school
nurses, is that right? – [Voiceover] That is correct. So, the other important piece
of the way we did things is that we were also
working at the state level. So, we had this model where we were mirroring at the state level, what we were doing at the community level. So, we had sort of a core pod
at each of the pilot sites of domestic violence, school nurses, and family training partners,
and we have that also mirrored at the state site where we were working with a state liaison for the school nurses and also family planning
folks at the state level to connect us with community-level
family planning people who would be interested in partnering at the community level, so the expectations
were really very similar at the community and state level. We have a community team
working on policy development and we also have the state level working on police development. We had the community teams
working on replication, we have the state level
working on replication. This was important because they had to be
mutually-supportive. If that makes sense, sort
of like a real framework. – [Voiceover] Yeah, that brings
to mind a couple of things. Both the importance of alignment like making sure that sort of everyone at all levels is sort of on the same page and how you could link various initiatives into the Project Connect work for example, and then also that communities
need support to do this work. It doesn’t happen on its own, typically, and there are lots that states can do and that the federal government can do to really make sure that cities
are supported in doing this in a way that really reflects the history and the
context of the community. What are some ways that you see that the state level work
really supported communities and really made sure
that their success was, maybe not insured, but
like likely, I guess? – [Voiceover] Sure, sure, well, each of the core state
entities, so domestic violence, PCADV has a membership for this program, so we worked with each
domestic violence partner, at the pilot sites, we
worked with them to make sure that they felt supported and
had everything they needed. We did the same thing with
the family planning partners at the state level, we had
our state level liaison connecting with the family
planning at the local level and making sure that they felt supported, and we also had the same
thing with the school nurse. We have a state level
school nurse association who was connecting with the school nurses. We communicated often at the state level and at the community level, they were communicating often also, and they also were meeting
on a monthly basis at first and then it kinda spread
out a little more later, but communication and trust building were extremely important across the board and the sort of mutually
supportive levels also. – [Voiceover] So, you mentioned
how important communication, well, then that comes up again and again in our trainings, too. When you say, you mentioned
you had monthly meetings, when you say communicating often, what does that actually look like? Is it emails, is it people
willing to pick up the phone and talk to one another
when issues come up? Like what does that actually
look like day to day? – [Voiceover] That’s all of the above. So, the baseline expectation was the monthly community meetings and then sort of following
through with planning that were sort of the
result of those meetings that included emails between each other or tapping into me if
they had more questions that they needed more information. I ended up really creating a lot of tools to support the teams such
as simple job descriptions. I was asked for a job description that the core team members could, and I was going to get
into this in a little bit, but I’ll get into it now, that they could share with
community team members. The core teams really invited
community stakeholders working on adolescent health to join them and that was really the way of building a community of practice and saturating the
community more and more, so that was one thing that we did. The outreach component
was really important through various levels of the community and communicating not
just within the core team, but continuing to make sure that any additional community
members who came on understood about the model, what the expectations are,
what events were going on, at whatever point they jumped in, what the domestic violence and
family planning partners did, so maybe that cross-training happened a couple of times during the grant span. So, it happened in the beginning and then maybe a couple of times later on. As far as communication
at the state level, we met on a quarterly basis or we’re still meeting
on a quarterly basis, and again, it’s emails,
it’s communication, it’s working on outcomes,
more strategizing together to be able to have some really concrete things that come out of the project. – [Voiceover] Great,
are there any questions in the text chat, Ashley, that you wanted to raise at this point? Perhaps not. – [Voiceover] I’m sorry I was muted. Yeah, I was muted. There’s a lot going on outside
of my hotel room right now. So, I didn’t want that background noise. I have asked some questions, but I am not seeing any questions. I’m still seeing, for
example, is it Chara, saying that they partner with
Planned Parenthood in Vermont, so I think that’s really interesting ’cause I had asked if anyone else partners with family
planning or healthcare and it looks like we do have some folks in the audience that are doing that. – [Voiceover] Yeah, I
also see Chara mentioning cultural biases within
organizations as a challenge. Fern, has that come up at all in any of the Pennsylvania
coalition sites? – [Voiceover] I would say that it came up probably, well, let me think about this here. It doesn’t come up as an overt issue. The span of our project sites was really across different
rural, urban, suburban areas, and I wouldn’t say that
it came up overtly, but we worked a lot
again on communication, so I think that it probably
came up within the team and it was dealt with. Now, as I’m talking, one
thing that did come up were conflicts between people’s ideas that were going on at family planning and perhaps ideas about
what they could support and what they couldn’t support, and what we really had to come back to was the bottom line that we’re all working to really prevent dating violence and also prevent teen
pregnancy, adolescent pregnancy, unwanted/unplanned pregnancy
as the result of abuse, and that’s our bottom line, so I would say that that was… That’s really the example
that comes to mind for me. – [Voiceover] Yeah, I think
having that trust-building, that basis for productive relationships sort of laid at the beginning
probably really help, ongoing communication, and it sounds like you had such a intensive
community engaged in process with all the different
stakeholders, the cross-training, hopefully that sort of
smoothed the way for you and it was possible to even have those really frank conversations
about cultural biases. I’m not sure if anyone
else in the audience wants to chime in on that, but in the meantime, I’m
actually really curious to hear, Fern, you know, you’ve been doing this for three years now with local coalitions, these strong partnerships
that have come out of it, what are you most proud
of about this initiative and what do you count as
sort of your biggest success? – [Voiceover] I think having reached, made contact with about 8,000 students with the healthy relationship messaging feels like a huge victory to me because this wasn’t anything
that had been done before, really engaging school nurses and really lifting them up as a domestic violence
point person in a school and then really bridging
what has really historically been a gap with partnering
with family planning and domestic violence in this way where you’re making referrals, really asking them to sort of look at sort of their notions of how
they perceive dating violence, and then really work with that and stretch sort of themselves around doing that universal messaging, and that feels like a really kind of a big accomplishment
that we had together between all of us, all of the sites. We were also able to grow with the six pilot sites that we had. We started with 17 partners and we were able to replicate that to 24 partners at this point and time and we’ve got non-funded partners that are picking up the model and our department of health, our Pennsylvania Department of Health has actually also picked up the model and hybridized it with
another model that they have for their five year RSA
on adolescent health. We’ve got a tool kit coming because of all of the work that we’ve done and really building it from the ground up and we’ve got a guiding chapter for Pennsylvania school
nurses on how they can also use this model and other
tips, lessons learned, that we had to help them be
successful in Pennsylvania, so I don’t know, it’s probably a long
answer to your question. – [Voiceover] Very long list of successes, we love to hear that. There are some questions in the text chat about Open Night Mic Night and how that fits in with
what you guys were doing? – [Voiceover] Oh, absolutely, so this was an event that came out of one of our pilot site core
team/community team initiative and it was an event where they
brought together 100 teens because they really wanted
to give them a place where they could feel
safe and welcomed (cough), excuse me, to talk about
healthy relationships and have access to
advocates and clinicians if they needed to,
right there on the spot. It helped out, too, that they gave away prizes and free food which
always attracts teens, but I really don’t think
that this would’ve happened without having a hundred teens attend this to talk about something so personal if that core team wasn’t so strong and if the community mobilization didn’t sort of feed the
success of the site work, and I really felt that that
was a really beautiful thing, that they were able to bring
this many teens together, so that’s really what it was. It was a night just for
teens to come together and perform and talk and
be supportive of each other and have support from local resources. – [Voiceover] Yeah, and
it brings back, for me, the comment earlier in the text chat about multi-component strategies because it’s like
initially at first glance, it sounds like you’re really working intensively with school nurses and developing school protocols around interacting with teens
and healthy relationships, but just having this poster on this slide demonstrates like there
are a lot of other things that are supplementing that
work, that are supporting it, and what other partners on the coalition are doing to make sure
that it’s successful and it’s reinforced in all
these different settings, so it’s great to see that. – [Voiceover] So that was the whole thing. I mean, the real baseline
ask of the core team was that they support the school nurse in delivering the healthy
relationship messages, being available whenever students came to them for support
and as referral for us, and really providing
any technical assistance or family planning/domestic
violence expertise to the nurse, that was the baseline ask. What grew from that were things like Teen-Only Open Mic
Night or Boys’ Night Out or Girls’ Night Out
where they came together to talk about health issues and healthy relationships
became one of them. There were Instagram photo
contests, teen video contests about healthy relationships,
poster contest, really each school site
also almost had a team of, like an in-school team itself, and that really was sort
of an unexpected outcome where we had once there was a
superintendent of the district and the principal of the
school joined the team because they felt that this was so important to their school. Yeah, it was really
neat to watch each teen sort of take on this growth
in their own unique way. Can I mention something
really quick that I meant to– – [Voiceover] Of course. – [Voiceover] Add in earlier. Something really important to the success of the school nurse was that
they have a phone on site for each student to us
if they need support, it’s called what we’re
calling a warm referral where if the student came and said they needed to use the phone, they would have a confidential phone that wasn’t traceable
by an abusive partner, so I wanted to throw that in as something that was really important to the success of
supporting the school nurse and really not expecting that
school nurse to be expert, but having a way to refer students then and there to the experts, and that trust and that communication, this was a really important
component to maintaining that. – [Voiceover] Just to quickly
address a question by Kristen, you first had to go through the school or the school district
administration, right, before you could reach out directly to the nurses, is that right? – [Voiceover] So, it
depended on the school. Really, we first reached
the school nurses, then that school nurse would reach out to their principal or board of directors or whomever they were
directed to reach out to. And how quickly that happened just depended on the school itself. – [Voiceover] Got it,
okay, so a lot of this is figuring out what are
the networks of people, how things actually get thing, who needs to give approval,
and who to get on board, so really kind of doing a little bit of research upfront on how where you work is sort of configured sounds like would be a smart first step for
people, is that right? – [Voiceover] I think that is, and also coming back
to that really original sort of strategy of
using the relationships that you already have in place and go for that low-hanging fruit who’s already connected to the school, do you have anybody working
on the intersections between healthcare and dating violence, who either knows the nurse or could make that easy
connection for you, just going in there, and then the other neat
thing that happened with Pennsylvania’s Project Connect 2.0 is that other schools
really saw it working at the pilot sites and the
replication went a lot faster because there are other
schools in the district that were really interested and the approval was already
there for one school, and once those schools
were sort of jumped through for that initial pilot that the other high schools in the district, where they saw the success, they said, “This is already in place, let’s do it,” so it was really easy to really replicate in some
districts because of that, but yes, it was a little
more time-consuming because of the approval
process using schools and that was part of one of the first lessons learned upfront is how are schools doing things differently than domestic violence and family planning and we all had to take a step back and assess that and really re-plan how we were gonna make this work and be realistic about the
time that it would take. – [Voiceover] Okay, thanks
so much, Fern, for sharing. I know that there’s some
additional questions in the text chat, we got one from Theresa on the specifics of the partnership, so feel free to continue,
everybody, sharing your questions, and Fern will be on
text chat with you all, and move on to sort of other
aspects of our webinar. So, thank you, Fern. – [Voiceover] Fern, thank you so much. – [Voiceover] Yeah, of course. – [Voiceover] I mean,
something I was actually really impress by with
the Project Connect story is how you really went through whatever door was opened to you and with working with other sectors, sometimes you have to get them on board and build trust first, and sometimes the way to do that is not an upfront prevention strategy. Sometimes it might make the most sense to work together on an intervention or an aftermath strategy, and then kind of add the prevention voice in that partnership of coalitions to sort of guide them
toward the up front end of the continuum when we’ve already had a track record of some success, and that there’s an eagerness
to continue working together. I think in a bar over
all of us, oh, go head. – [Voiceover] I was gonna
say that’s, I’m sorry, that’s exactly what we had to do and all of the teams have plans. I mean, the grants ending August 31st, but all of the teams have plans
to continue working together because they feel really bought in and they’ve built it
together, so yeah, exactly. – [Voiceover] Awesome. – [Voiceover] Thank you. – [Voiceover] Yeah, of course. I mean, that’s been almost for all us to be that strong voice for prevention, but also to sort of
know when you should be shouting that from the rooftops and when to sort of, you
need turn the volume down a little bit for the sake
of a long term relationship, really trying to meet
people where they are, so you can nudge them up stream when you have kind of
a strong relationship that’s already positive and that already sort of
have a history of success. – [Voiceover] Yeah. – [Voiceover] Let’s see, I’m curious… In terms of what sector are
you guys in the audience are most interested in working in? Sorry, most interested in partnering with. So that would be the
next polling question. Project Connect which we just talked about is one example of working
within the system, and I’m curious sort of
for the sake of our guests to give you sort of advice in text chat and in conversation, sort of which… Which of these sectors
you’re most interested in partnering with to prevent
sexual and domestic violence? So, these are very broad categories. A is education, schools,
maybe community colleges. B would be health, public
health, healthcare, hospitals. The justice would include law enforcement, courts, family court,
criminal justice, probation, and the D is really the community, sort of having those ties with people whose lives have
been affected by violence, survivors, faith-based groups. I know that a lot of people will say, “Ah, these look like arbitrary categories, “this is just reinforcing follows,” but it’s really helpful ’cause I think this is how the systems are kind of currently set up, and thinking about it this will help you sort of know how to break it down and understand where they all sort of blend and bleed together. So, it looks like currently
the most popular answer is education, so I’m glad we
really spent a bit of time focusing on how to engage schools. It looks like D, the community, is also incredibly
important that was true, and health and justice are also coming up as important partners. – [Voiceover] Janny says it’s
a difficult question to answer because all of them are so important which I think many people agree with, and then right after that,
Susan put A, C, and D. (laughter) – [Voiceover] Yeah, and this
not a comprehensive list. I mean, we’ve really talked
about how planning and zoning can get involved in preventing violence, how public work, how economic development, all of these things are so important. It’s just that for the
Defending Childhood initiative and the work that we’ve been
doing with that initiative, these are the four that
we really focused on. For those of you who weren’t really sure which one to pick, I’m
gonna share really quickly some of what the
practitioners I interviewed identified as a real strength and a contribution from
these various sectors. The health sectors were really seen as providing the
lens and the vocabulary for a group to discuss the
problem and develop solutions. So, really when you just
go with law enforcement or a lens or suppression lens on violence kind of really limits the solutions and the partners who can be at the table, but if you engage health, there’s this kind of common sense way of thinking about
violence that’s proactive, that’s very inclusive, for a
coalition to kind of develop a shared language around violence. For education, they were
really seen as bridging the grassroots and the grasstops, so bringing both the
community to the table with decision-makers in
government on more equal footing, so if that’s something that
you see as a gap in your work, engaging education might
be one way to address that. I think engaging the community, across the board, everyone said, “That’s where you get accountability,” making sure that everything you do is in the best interest of the people that you’re trying to forward. When you bring community
members into the mix that’s how you know you’re
going to be able to hold people accountable for what they promise they’re gonna do for the initiative. And then the justice sector, not many people, you
guys, identified justice as a group you wanted to engage and I think they’re really the folks who are held the most accountable for addressing violence in most places and so they’re expected
to lead the conversation and they really bring the initiative. If you’re able to convince justice to make room for other sectors including nonprofit organizations working on sexual and
domestic violence prevention to engage them in doing the
upfront prevention piece. I mean, I think having police chiefs say, “We can’t arrest our
way out of this problem, “we need to partner with other
people to do prevention,” they really bring a legitimacy to the work and to help to bring others in
line and drawn in resources. So, I wanna encourage you
guys to consider a partner in justice also if that
opportunity presents itself and you think it’s a
realistic place to push because if you can get justice on board, I think it can really open a lot of doors in terms of the prevention work. – [Voiceover] And Benita, it
looks like Jody’s talking about how they sit on task
forces with the police, looks like maybe with judges, DA, I’m wondering starts
a lot of those kind of multi-disciplinary groups
do partner with justice and I’m wondering if maybe that was lower because folks are already
partnering with them. – [Voiceover] That’s
a great point actually ’cause I asked what people
are most interested in and yeah, maybe that’s
already an established thing and you guys don’t need
that so much, not anymore. So, let’s move on and
speak to some of our guests in Multnomah County where
Portland, Oregon is. You’ll remember at the beginning I share that one of the major findings from the Defending Childhood work is that systems are not
set up for collaboration even when practitioners are really hungry for a new way of working together. The Multnomah County site
is an excellent example of a systems change approach that’s really trying to make things easier for all sectors and issues to sort of collaborate on stuff like this. So, keep typing your questions and reactions in the text chat box and we’ll try to address
them, but for now, I’d like Erin to unmute
herself and let’s get started. – [Voiceover] Can you hear me? – [Voiceover] Yes, I can hear you. – [Voiceover] Okay, great. – [Voiceover] Welcome to the conversation. – [Voiceover] Well, thanks for having me. – [Voiceover] Yeah,
Multnomah County’s focus on social justice and systems change really is an inspiration
to me and to other places. How did you arrive on a
systems change approach to this work and what
effects has that approach had on what you decided to pursue? – [Voiceover] Well, thank you for that and definitely we are still, when it comes to social justice, we’re still a work in progress. I think our Defending
Childhood initiative, I’ll talk about why we placed
a value on systems change and the particular social
justice focuses that we do have, but I also wanna point just
to be transparent and sure that when you look across
our county outcomes that communities, disenfranchised and marginalized communities
are experiencing, we’re not as progressive as
people sometimes think we are, so I always like just come back and point that we still have the same disproportionality in overall presentation in communities of color around poverty and around child welfare involvement and around juvenile justice
and school exclusion. So, just to be completely transparent, I hope that makes sense, but it’s actually very motivating for us to look at how all of
these disproprotionalities are so related to how
people experience violence and how if we wanna address
up stream root causes, we have to always looking through and working through an equity lens particularly a racial justice lens, so that’s something
that we really try hard to embed in our work. How we focused on a
systems change approach, Defending Childhood looks
at all types of violence, so we look at the kinds of violence that happens in families, so obviously, domestic violence
is one of the primary ways that kids are exposed to violence. So, we also look at other ways that kids are exposed to
violence in their homes, in their communities, in their schools, state-sanctioned violence, the kinds of violence that happens when communities have disproportionate contacts with law
enforcement, all of that. Some of the great, I think, benefits of this initiative that we’re so excited that the federal government is looking at how all these forms of
violence are connected, and when we look at how
all those forms of violence are connected, we see that a lot of them have the same upstream risk factors, but then the key of that is they also have very similar protective factors. So, we noticed early on
that our system partners, in particular, and stakeholders
were really tired of all the same people going
to yet another meeting. (gravely static) was we don’t wanna have
another collaborative for Defending Childhood
where the same people that we work with across all these sectors have to come together for
another specific task, we’d rather you,
Defending Childhood, embed your expertise and your
resources across our systems. So, the nature of that feedback meant, and this is something I acknowledge for people who are carrying a case load would be challenging, but
if you have the luxury of being in more of a
outreach or coordinator role, we decided it was really important for us to focus systems changed
and embed ourselves across those four sectors
that this webinar is about. – [Voiceover] Yeah, we
found out, a few mentioned on the text chat that
it’s a little staticy, so lean back a little bit from the mic that way you can reduce the buzzing. But that’s really wonderfuL approach, really incorporating an
understanding of equity and adverse childhood
experience into all of the, can you share a couple of
examples of how you’ve been able to advance those goals in
partnership with other sectors? – [Voiceover] Sorry, I
was speaking to close, is this a little bit better? – [Voiceover] Yes, that
sounds much better to me. – [Voiceover] I’m so sorry
to all the attendees. – [Voiceover] I’m sure the audience will tell us if it gets worse. They’re a very responsive audience. – [Voiceover] I got excited
and just started talking and here we are. So, how we’re advancing the strategies? Well, we get asked this a lot and wish that I could say like, “Well, here’s this new
thing that’s not known to us “that we did that is the magic answer,” but really it has been gaining
trust and I’d say earn trust and kind of demonstrating
the added benefit by being involved in sectors,
all of these sectors, so what that has looked like is me and my colleagues in the
Defending Childhood Initiative are on a lot of advisories and committees and other initiatives that
have overlapping goals and it means that in some cases particularly in the work
that we’ve been developing in the education sector
with out school districts, it’s taking years of showing up and doing what we said we would do and learning how to speak
the language of that system, and learning how to shape and package our information and our
goals in a way that line up with the specific goals of those systems. I think a great example,
well, two that come mind. One is that we do have a
really heavy and deep focus on working within educational
settings to promote trauma-informed practice in
classrooms and in schools, and that has taken a lot of
time and relationship-building, to build the trust of
school administrators, a lot of work force development. So, we’ve done a lot of
free training for schools and giving access to teachers, everyone wants to train teachers, that took a lot of trust building through a variety of avenues. Early on, we identified the
people who had influence in those fields, but
who also were champions, kind of like early adopter philosophy, and we made friends with those people and then they invited us into the system and through that relationship, it kinda gave us some credibility and we’re able to work together, and I’ll just say briefly that right now, we have seven large school
districts in Multnomah County and we’re working with
one of them in particular. We believe what we’re gonna do with them after all these years of
coordination and working together is a year-long trauma-informed
practice change collaborative kind of like a learning community approach where we are looking directly
at how education equity, so reducing disproportionality, and trauma-informed
practice in classrooms, and restorative justice or
positive school discipline, we’re calling it a
three-legged stool approach. How we can really drive
expertise of educations, that are already excited
about those issues to create some systems change in outcome over that school year and
over that planning process, if that makes sense. So, we’re really excited about that. – [Voiceover] I mean, I’m
already seeing a lot of overlap between sort of like the
mechanisms and processes that Fern used in order– – [Voiceover] Yeah. – [Voiceover] Very different program was that you did in terms of trying to get a variety of avenues, identifying
people who can influence others and be your champions, forming a learning community, so you’re kind of all in this together, and the cross-training element where people really need to develop
skills to do this worthwhile, and having them train
together and learn together really advances the
relationships and the trust also to implement together, so
that’s really remarkable, actually, I hadn’t expected
to see so much overlap between what you’re doing ’cause I think at first
glance it seemed like you’re taking very different tacks and yet the processing’s very similar. – [Voiceover] Yeah, I
mean, when people said, when our stakeholders said, and then I can talk
about how we’ve supported the community health worker approach that Abdullah’s gonna share about, so that really touches a
organic primary prevention and a community involvement
and community-led practices, and we heard from our stakeholders
that they were tired of, they didn’t want another initiative, they didn’t want another
collaborative, just showing up, people always say, “Don’t be
perfect be the enemy of good,” and it really has played out here that we just roll up our sleeves
and go where we’re invited, and then kind of humble ourselves to hear what we have to learn from each sector, and really just be creative
about not letting those perceived barriers stop
us from working together, but a lot of it is really not recognized, it’s like showing up and doing
what you say you’re gonna do and paying attention to how people talk, so if you’re in a healthcare setting and they’re talking about
metrics and cost-savings, I have to figure out what that means and then how am I gonna talk about adverse childhood experiences
and childhood trauma in a way that speaks to
metrics and reducing cost, but as an example. – [Voiceover] Yeah, I
remember you mentioning something about the youth commission and working with law enforcement, can you tell me a little
bit more about that? – [Voiceover] Sure, yeah. So, Multnomah County, Portland
is really, really lucky in that we have the
Multnomah Youth Commission which is an official policy-making body that is led by a coalition of youth, so they make policy recommendations to our elected officials and other leaders and actually drive a lot of
change and do a lot of advocacy, and really with a social justice lens, one of the projects that the
Youth Commission has done that for three years, they hosted a Youth
Against Violence summit, and Defending Childhood,
myself, and some colleagues were the adult staff
for the group of youth that were wanting to address
sexual and dating violence, and again as an example of, there’s an opportunity that
need some adults to sign on, so we think it’s gonna take
a lot of our staff time, but it’s gonna leverage
so much good information, so much learning from
us, so much resource, so it’s worth that time-investment for us. So, I staffed that youth group for the three years during the summer and then during the Youth
Against Violence summit, we did, our youth did focus
groups of other youths about their experiences with
sexual and dating violence particularly how the adults
in their life address it and maybe how they
could address it better, and we’ve got a lot of focus group data about recommendation,
policy recommendations, and then we helped with the
workshop at the last summit about sexual and dating violence, it was again focused on policy
recommendations from youths, and when the adult policymakers were invited to attend the sessions, we were just lucky enough that the mayor attended our session, and he had a lot of
questions for the youth about how law enforcement
could better respond to young people who are reporting sexual and dating violence, so
that got our youth so excited and impassioned, I think
they just felt so legitimized that the mayor was talking with them, and so this year, their project
that they chose themselves, I mean, I learn so much from them, I really just show up and kinda sit back and facilitate them in
their own expertise, but they wanted to do
training for law enforcement about how to better respond and what they landed on as
their project was developing, a role call video that will be shown to law enforcement officers
that is youth-created, youth-led, youth-directed,
that gives informatIon in a positive sort of we’re
all in this together kind of, how can we best appeal to police officers, so they’re gonna be, they
just wrote the script, and we have the support
of our local police bureau and the mayor’s office,
they’ll be helping us film a promotional video featuring youths who will be just, I think,
expanding the conversation, helping officers
understand why young people might be hesitant or have trouble reporting sexual and dating violence and how officers can
be the most supportive. – [Voiceover] Yeah, that’s wonderful. I mean, it’s another
example of the importance of engaging the community, engaging people whose
lives are really affected in all aspects of the process, right, not just sort of running
something pass them and getting their approval, but having them shape the content, having them be the people implementing, and I think that’s such a huge asset, and we so often sort of overlook that depth and richness that
they could bring to our work. – [Voiceover] Well, I mean,
the youth that came up really thoroughly researched how to appeal to police officers. I mean, they consulted with some allied law enforcement officers about how to really
package the information in a way that will be received
well by law enforcement, but will also, as we talked
about, speak truth to power, and how they’ll be able
to really represent the hundreds of voices of young people that they interviewed and focus groups over the past few years, and
they have come up with ideas that I could never come
up with as an adult, that are just so empowered and exciting, and they really get to face, a lot of good is gonna
happen as they grow up. – [Voiceover] Yeah, I mean, it sounds like you’ve worked so effectively
with young people, with law enforcement and schools, with high-level elected
officials like the mayor over the last three years, do you have any last bits of advice in terms of sharing with the audience, what was the biggest
factor in your success? Like how did you do it, so we can all sort of
follow in your footsteps. – [Voiceover] Wow, geez. I think that other than showing up, I think, I’ve already said this, but I think really being
able to almost like shift the way that you
interact constantly. So, the way that I’m gonna
talk about domestic violence and youth engagement
with the mayor’s office is gonna be different than
the way I talk about it with a local grassroots
domestic violence provider that we’re funding is gonna be different than the way I talk about it with youths, and so I think it really requires putting yourself in
the shoes of the person that you’re talking to, the
entity that you’re talking to, so if you’re talking with
local government officials, you won’t be thinking about
how, I mean, to be really frank, you wanna appeal to their good nature, but you also wanna think
about how is their involvement in this project gonna look
good for them politically. Already, it’s a great
opportunity for our mayor to support domestic violence because he’s committed to that and also he gets to show up in a video where he supporting it and validating it that’s youth-created, that’s
a win-win for everybody. So, being able to think about
things through that lens, and it is a challenge to
stay true to those ethics of social justice and social change, but really, a lot of people, at least, maybe we’re different than some other jurisdictions, but people are excited about
that and want to do it, we just have to figure out
how to speak their language. – [Voiceover] That’s great. – [Voiceover] And we just also have to, one last thing I’ll say that
so much learning I’ve done over the past few years in this role is that I think coming from, I came up in the grassroots
domestic violence movement and had a very specific
way that I talk about domestic violence and
talked about survivors and talked about how I
felt about victim-blaming, all of the values that we hold as domestic violence and
sexual assault advocates, and I really had to kind of, I don’t know how to
describe it, lower my guard or be patient with people who didn’t necessarily have that
same language and lens and the last base for a
different perspective, and kind of hold my tongue a little bit to develop relationships
and really try to understand where people were coming from in a way that was just really new to me when I was just focused on
the domestic violence field, I hope that makes sense. – [Voiceover] No, that
makes complete sense, and I think a lot of people
struggle with that, right? IN order for the relationship
and the partnership to work, we kinda have to start seeing things from another perspective,
that’s new, that’s unfamiliar, that we might not entirely agree with, and yet we have to practice sort of seeing the world through that lens in order to connect, to build trust, to sort of move forward together, and I think after I talk
with Abdullah really quickly, we’ll continue talking
about self-reflection, and how we can sort of
address our blind spots in order to advance this work and partnership with other sectors, so thanks a lot, Erin,
that makes complete sense. I’m really really excited
to share the success of Defending Childhood
work in Multnomah County. – [Voiceover] Thank you. – [Voiceover] Yeah, so
something else I found really compelling about
what’s going on in Oregon was also how you’ve been
able to leverage investments by various initiatives that work in little bit different forms of violence. So, really aligning local initiatives was really one of those
explicit strategies that you guys pursued,
so I wanna ask Abdullah even though you work in the
same department as Erin, I think most of your
work is really focused on youth violence, right? Abdullah, are you there? You might be on mute still, so if you push star 6, I think
we’ll be able to hear you. – [Voiceover] There we go, there we go. – [Voiceover] Okay, yay! – [Voiceover] Hello, everybody. To answer your question real quick. So, we’re located within
the actual health department and I think the other
part of your question was we do our initiative through
Center for Disease Control with a focus on youth, but the main objective is
really to bring public health to the conversation of
violence in general, so we actually address many
different forms of violence, but the strategy we’re
focusing on right now is primarily focused on youth, but that’s also joining into a couple of different areas as well, too. – [Voiceover] Yeah, so how
did you and Erin connect and start working together? Like was it obvious from the beginning you wanted the same
things for the community or was it a bit of a negotiation with her? – [Voiceover] It was definitely obvious. As Erin mentioned, she’s been very active in being present in the necessary places, it’s one of the things that our program had to be involved in as well, too. It’s not necessarily a, for some people it’s not a no-brainer that public health should be involved in certain conversations
specifically around violence, so it’s a bit of advocating
and making that space for public health to be involved, and sitting at those tables, we had actually found ourselves at the center of the tables with Erin and with a natural progression
to large-scale prevention and primary prevention
coagulated very easily, and Erin’s very proactive
with our coordinator, Rebecca Stavenjord, they have
built a good relationship, and we was able to connect
up on many different level, and done really good work since
we’ve been joined together. – [Voiceover] Yeah, so why don’t you share a little bit about the
work you’ve been doing and how the partnership
with Defending Childhood had really enhanced what
you’ve been able to do. – [Voiceover] Yeah, so
the direct connection, I think the initial connection was around children exposure to violence for us in that we’re looking at the
pretty much associative term is why is violence
happening in the first place and one of the things
that comes to the table is like what’s happening
inside these homes, what’s happening inside the community, and again the environment
of sex, the human behavior, and the human behavior usually translates to some form of violence, so the children exposure
to violence curriculum was developed through Erin in partnership with the
office I come up out of which is community dispatch center which is also the primary trainage for community health works
here inside of Oregon, and that particular curriculum, like me, personally, I
went through the training, so as a community health worker I had the community-based connection, and then we get the
opportunity to be trained in order to be able to
engage on different levels whether it be educating
the actual community as well as sitting at
tables to engage the system, so that children exposure
to violence piece is really crucial because it
led to other conversations about trauma, historical
trauma, really went deeper into various other factors that really contribute
to certain populations are experiencing violence
disproportionately in contrasts to other populations. Me, personally, one of
the great pieces is that I come from a background
of this experience and I grew up gangbanging, and spent a good portion of
my life, was incarcerated, and having that understanding around the children exposure to violence, had lots of experiences with violence, and just take the overall science of what does that do to the mind, what does that do to the overall behavior, became crucial and evident
from the work I’m involved in and again, as a community health work, I sit at three different levels, I’m engaged in direct service
with community members, I may actually help someone negotiate some form of conflict that they’re having, youth, specifically, in a
relationship with their peers, conversations from that level. I even take a gun out of someone’s hand on a community-based level, but I’m also training and
using our relationship with the community around understanding why gangs are in our community, why violence is more predominant, why is it okay for us to hurt other people and not really think
that’s an abnormal thing, that it’s normal, I’m able
to educate now on that level and as well as I face the other system in discussing informed policy, and that’s one of the key points about the community health worker that it sits at all three levels, but the most important piece is that it also is the system opportunity to go access the communities because we’re leaning on
our existing relationship with the community like I
come from the very community and I’m gonna share this
particular service, too, and saying that look, this is okay. We can actually maybe utilize
this particular service because in other cases,
when you get ’em invited, you can learn about the justice system. The justice system in many cases has actually caused riots in the community and people somewhat feel some trepidation interacting with systems,
they’ve had historical, should I call them challenges? Whether it be racism or various
other forms of inequities that very exist, so my job will be to go and actually make them feel that it’s okay to go ahead and give
this particular strategy or this particular
organization an opportunity to help them resolve the
challenge they’re dealing with. – [Voiceover] Thanks a lot, Abdullah. I mean, just that whole,
that raise a lot of questions for me, actually, I
mean, one of them is how a lot of times people say,
“Government’s part of the problem “or they’re part of the violence “and why this is happening
for so many groups of people” and I always have to push
back on them and say, “Government is part of the problem “and it also has to be part
of the solution” in terms of the resources they can
bring, the systems change, like for a sustainable long-term solution, they have to be part of that conversation, so it’s wonderful to hear
that you’re really helping people rebuild that trust and
figure out a role for them that is empowering and affirming in moving forward in
partnership with other sectors. – [Voiceover] Yeah, absolutely, and it’s a big piece of that. It’s also about invasion of community and sharing the language of the systems ’cause that’s also cryptic as well, too. Many people, they
understand what’s going on, but they don’t necessarily understand the details of what’s going on, how they can actually impact the system, so breaking that language down, but even more so, almost
being culturally bilingual and helping the system really understand the language of the community because there is a disconnect right there. I believe there’s a
lot of good intentions, but when you go into the community and you’re behaving in the way that you’ve been trained to behave, a lot of that can disregard
some of the sensitivities or some of the actual barriers
that you’re gonna encounter, but when you have that liaison
right there in the middle and again the big piece about the Defending Childhood Initiative and its partnership with us was that it’s also about helping that person with that lived experience
and that shared experience dealing their capacities, so I experienced multiple
levels of training through the program, I’m with STRYVE as well as in partnership with DCI, again children exposure to violence is one of the trainings that I attended, but also, once I’m actually being trained and I’m accessing my
relationships with the community and I’m also the table
within these systems, I then also now have the capacity to go and actually teach
and go and educate, and be able to take those two
worlds and bring ’em together and show how they have to negotiate, how they have to work together, in order for the solution to be possible. – [Voiceover] For the
folks in the audience who want to engage the health department, what’s your best advice for them? Is it to go through the
community health worker or is it through another
avenue, do you think? – [Voiceover] I would say
at the end of the day, so one of the other challenges too, so the CDC back in the
1990s declared violence as a public health issue, that idea is that when you have population disproportionately exposed to violence that creates that toxic stress, the toxic stress leads to disproportionate incidence of crime and disease, so the public health has to be there and it should be there. Unfortunately, although, the
National Health Department has been calling for that, local level community health departments haven’t really responded
in that particular way. The CDC recently, about four years ago, tried to kick off an
initiative to help rebirth that level of ownership
from health departments. One of the things I’ve learned since I’ve been involved in
this work it’s about really taking ownership or
helping the public health take ownership of the is model that look at the end of the day,
this is a responsibility that you actually have and you have a great opportunity to benefit this particular work because you’re focused on root causes, you’re focused on the narrative, you’re focused on the context. Other disciplines, although
they make focus on prevention, it’s not their primary expertise, it’s not what they have to hold on to no matter what else, public health has to
focus on the root causes, that’s its strategy, it’s the epistemology of public health. So, sharing that, not only saying that, “Hey, look, we need you here “and these are the
reasons why we need you,” it’s almost like you have to educate, in a real humble way,
educate health officials of the benefit of them being at the table and then showing them also in that by giving existing models
that actually have worked, how they can actually
be an asset to the work. One of the things I’ve learned is that fact that often the health department has a very unique relationship, the primary people who deal with violence as we all mentioned today
is the justice system and use a suppression lens,
that can be very hurtful and it has been hurtful
to many communities. There’s not that much
access when they try, when systems started to engage because of that very relationship
with the justice system. Public health, when it comes to violence, doesn’t have that relationship, it hasn’t used guns, it
hasn’t used handcuffs, it hasn’t used gavels to lock people up and put ’em in the most
violent place in America and bring ’em back to society where they can only work
and live in certain places, and then the cycle continues. Public health is saying,
“Look, I’m interested “in learning about that narrative” and that’s exactly what the communities are interested in learning, you talk to average community
members, they’re saying, “Man, look, this just doesn’t
happen by happen chance. “there’s a reason why this is happening.” Public health model of root
causes, social determinants, and the ideal of obviously
upstream solutions, this is the language that communities really wants to actually see happening more in their communities. So, it’s about making those connections similar to what Erin did,
that shared language, but specifically with health departments is also encouraging and reminding
and also making them aware of the responsibility based
on what their philosophy is and what they’re again the
connection to crime and diseases and the toxic stress, but
then sharing with them what type of amazing work can be done if they took ownership
of that responsibility. – [Voiceover] Yeah, it sounds
like what you’re saying is very similar to how folks
have already outreached to schools and to other sectors, so it’s really finding that common ground, understanding the language that their using in their mandate, and then drawing the
connection to prevent violence and making that overlap very clear and pointing them to a
specific contribution, does that sound right? – [Voiceover] That’s absolutely true, and again, I’ll just reiterate, that the piece around happen to encourage, health departments get involved in it because again from the
experience we’ve had here that’s also been a challenge and we’ve been very successful at encouraging our own health department in a sense to take more ownership, but initially it wasn’t
the most automatic thing. Individuals felt like, “Well,
is that really our vein “and we have some efforts already existing “in certain areas specifically
in the sexual violence.” There is some work within
the county here locally that does work around violence
prevention in that area, but the reality is this, and I’ll share this with the audience, is that the sexual violence
and the domestic violence is rooted in a baseline
deappreciation for human life. If men are hurting men, believe me, it’s easier for them to hurt without any type of sense of trepidation or any type of sense of concern about them hurting each other
’cause they do it frequently, they’re gonna hurt women
and children even more because the value of human
life is then decreased, so my thing is across the board this ideal of sanctity of life, this ideal of saying that it’s not okay for people to hurt people has
to be pushed across the board, and then very specific
areas be highlighted. Misogyny is a big
problem across the world. Something about this era that we live in and probably eras before we lived in, that’s a huge problem, we
can focus even more there as we need to which I
know this group here does, but when it comes to the public
health and other sectors, but specifically public health, violence across the board, and the fact that human beings whether it be for gangs
or because of terrorism or whatever the case may be, have lost or learned to devalue life, so they hurt each other more frequently. – [Voiceover] Yeah, and
I think what I’m hearing is to bring that moral argument as well as sort of the logical argument, like it can’t just be,
“Here’s all the facts, “here’s why it’s in your interest,” but also bring up the moral argument to revisit sort of the fact
that every life is sacred and how to protect that is
everybody’s responsibility and work, so thanks so much, Abdul, that was very, very moving, and I hope the audience is taking notes because he basically laid
all your talking points over creating a public health department to support efforts to prevent
sexual and domestic violence. And in the last
– [Voiceover] Yeah, I think – [Voiceover] Yeah, go ahead,
Abdul, any last remarks? – [Voiceover] No, I
think that’s basically, yeah, but obviously, of
course, you guys are doing amazing work and I obviously
appreciate it coming from ’cause I’m pretty sure other
people inside this space also come from communities
that’s been impacted by violence, but coming from a world where,
again, that not valuing life, it is a moral issue, but
it’s so a deteriorating of society at every point
from education down to, from politics down to economics, and that’s a conversation
that’s been happening before, so it’s a human piece, it’s a moral piece, but it’s also a fundamental
civilization piece, we’re deteriorating as a
result, so the work you guys do, I just wanna say thank you and I appreciate each
one of you guys for that as well appreciate you giving me and Erin an opportunity to share the work that we’re doing here in Multnomah County. – [Voiceover] Thank you, Abdul. In the last five minutes or so, I really wanna visit really quickly sort of turning a spotlight on ourselves and thinking about how
we can be better partners and what skills we need to develop in order to develop these kinds of cross-sector partnerships. So, a couple of months ago,
I saw this photo on Twitter that seemed to perfectly capture
the idea of mansplaining, and for those of you who don’t know, I can’t imagine that folks
in this audience don’t know, but mansplaining is
really where usually a man feels he has to explain something usually to a woman in a really condescending and obnoxious way often when the women doesn’t really need an explanation at all on the topic and she knows plenty
from her own experience. I thought this was really hilarious, but it also got me thinking like the guy in the status, he’s
probably pretty clueless and has no idea that
the women on the bench just wants to get back to her book, trying real hard not to roll
her eyes, and it made me think what are we doing as
practitioners that comes off really poorly to potential
partners, in body language or our tendencies to sort
of call people out on like victim-blaming language, for example, which Erin raised, kind
of things that we do that we don’t even realize are
undermining our joint effort, so I wanted to open it up to our guests, to Ashley, to the text chat, to really talk about what
skills do we need to cultivate in order to be better
partners across sectors? And I think that the really… – [Voiceover] Sorry, I was on mute again. I just wanted to say one
of the things I noticed is a lot of times we focused on oh, we have to get people on board, we have to get people to
believe in partner with, get them x, y, and z, but what
I can tell from this group, at least through the text chat, is we don’t have to do
that, people are on board, so now it’s a matter of
actually taking a concrete step, and for me, I think the first one is, it might sound simple, but
I think folks who’ve done it know it’s not necessarily,
but that relationship-building and that can take many forms, it has to be unique to the
individuals in the group and the partnerships, but
I think the first this is trying to form a relationship. – [Voiceover] All right,
there’s already been a few other comments in the chat about speaking to others with respect, making sure you use words that demonstrate and express respect for others, being willing to start small, develop relationships
before diving into the work and you just have to begin again, and I think already our guests have talked a lot about humility, about going where you’re
invited, showing up consistently, kind of following through
on what you say you’ll do, all those things seems so small and yet can have such a huge impact on whether people trust you
and wanna work with you. – [Voiceover] I think something that again worked with Project Connect
was those cross-trainings that were really an expectation up front at the community team level because that opened doors to questions that people either didn’t wanna ask or didn’t even realize they had, and so I think it really
hones their listening skills and really consider the heart
of where everybody’s meeting. – [Voiceover] I would add
too real quick, this is Erin, that one thing I learned and noticed is that in some systems
where they just weren’t used to someone from domestic violence or children’s mental health
or childhood trauma world sitting at their table, at the very personal, authentic level, I felt distrust, I felt
like maybe not so welcome at some of the tables in the beginning, and I think before this project, I might’ve thought, “Well,
they’re just not open “to domestic violence information “because they’re not
willing to do the work “or to do self-reflection,” but I just sort of had to figure out how to just put those
feelings aside and keep coming even though I didn’t
feel welcomed at first and then a year later,
I feel like we all have all these great relationships and we’re working so well together, so I think being willing
to be uncomfortable especially when people
are different than you or have different perspectices, and dealing with that discomfort
and pushing through it has been really helpful. – [Voiceover] Erin, that
reminds me of something that we learned called
strategic questioning that I found really useful
through the project training. It just reminded me of that, I don’t know if anyone
else has ever heard of it, but I wanted to throw it out there. – [Voiceover] Something
that I often say too, being proactive, a lot of time there’s
a scarcity of resources that people are scrambling for funding, so if you could be
proactive in offering ways in which other organizations can benefit from your presence in there, whether it be social
capital, political capital, or actual funding
opportunities or whatnot, if you’re the one
presenting that to the table and having in your hand out to give, then that will neutralize some
of the barriers as well too because many of the organizations
do the work that we do, they’re not necessarily always funded in the best way that they need to be. – [Voiceover] I see in the text chat a lot of folks are saying,
“Patience, patience, patience,” that’s very true, this stuff
can take a lot of time. I mean, Erin was sharing earlier about how it was many years of showing up, of being supportive, and
doing a lot of the things that Abdul and Fern were talking about, so sharing resources, training together, getting to know one another,
in order to do the work. Looks like Marissa’s talking
about being creativity, challenging each other to really think like what is it gonna
take to prevent violence at the population-level,
to be ambitious about what you wanna accomplish
and realistic about who we need for any of us to get there, even if it is uncomfortable
or it is challenging, sort of being poised to take advantage of the opportunities
that present themselves. Anyone else want to add a last few words before I share some final
resources and wrap up. – [Voiceover] I just wanted
to say it’s not always easy, it can be really painful to
really cross those bridges or gaps and come back to the
place where you need to be and just don’t give up. – [Voiceover] So, what gets
you through that, Fern? Like how do you
– [Voiceover] So what now? – [Voiceover] So, what gets you through those painful moments so that you sort of come
out at the other side? Like is it remember
kind of the bigger goal or is there something that you hang on to when things are really tough,
so that you stick with it? – [Voiceover] It’s humility, it’s the bottom line of the project. It’s really trying to put
yourself in someone else’s place and understand where they’re coming from, it’s all those things that we sort of know already as advocates, but when we get put in a
position that’s challenging, it’s hard to remember that, so kind of reaching back into that place where you remember those
advocacy skills for ourselves, that we like to help other people with. – [Voiceover] So, I’d like
to move really quickly and share some tools for the audience that might be helpful in your work. One of them is Connecting the Dots which is an overview of
research on the links among multiple forms of violence. I mean, Abdul already
made an excellent case for why we have to do this work together, it can’t just be one type
of violence or another, but there’s so many root causes and resilience factors in common. Another is Building Community Commitment for Safe, Stable, Nurturing
Relationships Environments. This is another CDC document on really engaging the community in an effort to make sure that all the sectors involved
and the local leaders are held accountable
for addressing violence and making sure everyone is
able to be safe and thrive, and then finally, coming soon, we have three papers on the
Defending Childhood Initiative. Some of these will feature
quotes from Erin and others, and there’s also the
collaboration multiplier anaylsis coming out this summer on preventing domestic violence specifically that will look at engaging various sectors in California on preventing violence that I hope is really
relevant to your work. So, sign up for e-alerts
at Prevention Institute to get notices on when those are actually on our website and available, and of course, I would love to hear from all of you on how it’s going, feel free to call or
email me with questions. My address is on the slide now and I know all of our guests would like to connect with you too if
there’s a chance to share advice, lessons learned, and challenges. – [Voiceover] Great, well,
thank you so much, oh, yeah? – [Voiceover] The one last
thing I’ll say is that Annie Lyles who usually hosts these says hello to all of you and
she had her baby last week, and I’m sure she’s excited to hear sort of your progress
while she’s out on leave, so please stay connected
with PreventConnect and with Prevention Institute. – [Voiceover] Great and
congratulations to Annie. So, this is Ashley with PreventConnect, we are at time, so I just
wanna thank everybody, we have gotten a lot of great
examples and perspectives and had really good
communication with each other, and advice and insights and all of that, so that’s what we hope to
do on these web conferences and we did it today, so I
encourage you to sign up for the next web conference
on Closing the Loop and Sustainability that is August 13th, and you can go to preventconnect.com
to sign up for that. In about 30 minutes, you’ll
receive a followup email that has a link to the evaluation in it and I really hope that you fill that out, that helps us determine
what you all are looking for in our web conferences
and how they’re going, so please fill that out and with that I will close
this web conference out, and we look forward to seeing you online. – [Voiceover] Thank you. – [Voiceover] Bye. – [Voiceover] Thank you.

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