How to exploit your opponent’s bad piece?

How to exploit your opponent’s bad piece?


Hello everyone! Let’s see a brilliant Capablanca’s win in this video. It’s a very typical game on topic “How to use opponent’s bad piece?”. The game was played in Hastings, 1919. Capablanca was Black against William Winter and let’s
see what happened in the game. Well, game of four knights (opening). Bb5, Bb4, 0-0, 0-0 and today, d3-Bc3 is more common but Bxc6 is more patient continuation and that was the idea of Aron Nimzowitsch. What’s the point? White intends, after d3, to prepare for advancing f4 as well as the opening of f-file and the manoeuvring of the outpost on f5..and attack on opponent’s king. dxc6 happened. d3, Bd6, Bg5. h3 was better with the idea of Ne2-g4-Ng3-Nf5. What’s the point? In the game Bg5 happened. This move does not fit in with above-mentioned plan by Nimzowitsch. The correct way to continue is h3-g4-Ne2-Ng3-Nf5. Occasionally, White usually goes to g2 with Rh1 or to h1 with Rg1 idea. After that preparation White must carry
out the thrust of f4 and then attack the opponent’s king. Very often, game takes on positional character after exchange of several pieces. And you will see soon why Bg5 was wrong choice. h6, Bh4 and c5. Not only preventing White’s d4 in some variations but also setting some trap. What’s the point? Nd2 is better with idea of Nc4-Ne3. And then trying to occupy d5 or f5. But Nd5 happened immediately and that is a serious, maybe even decisive mistake. What’s the point? Before Nd5, for instance, in that position, Black cannot play g5 because Nxg5, hxg5 Bxg5 with dangerous pin and some possibilities for White to activate play on kingside. But after c5, Nd5, g5 is perfect move! What’s the point? Now Nxg5 isn’t working because Nxf5 will cost White a piece. So after g5, Nxf6 is the only move. Qxf6, Bg3 and Bg4. Very simply and at the same time, very brilliant move by Capablanca. What can Black do? f3-knight is pinned. Sooner or later White must play h3. And now of course not Bh5, not Be6 but simply.. Bxf3, Qxf3, Qxf3, gxf3 and now you can see red
mark on g3 because g3-bishop is very bad. And green mark on d6 because d6-bishop will be very good. Surprisingly, most of the White’s pawns are on light squares and most of Black pawns are on dark squares but still Black bishop on d6 is much better than White’s bishop on g3. This is very instructive classical position. White is practically playing a piece down. g3-bishop is shut and can only become free by a pawn sacrifice. For instance, White can play Kg2-Bh2-f4 and then after exf4, White can play f3 with Bg1 but that costs both time and material. What should be Black’s correct plan to realize his big positional advantage? Well, it’s simple. If opponent has a weak piece (bad piece) on one flank, you should just switch to another side of the board. Well, Black’s correct plan is attack on queenside with his advantage in space and after breakthrough to open up the queenside, Black will have an extra piece – d6-bishop. First of all, f6 to free d6-bishop by defending e5-pawn. Kg2 and a5. There are many possibilities for black to open position
on queenside with dangerous initiative there. Having an extra piece..maybe b5 was also reasonable option. But okay.. a5 was played with idea of a4 and of course White plays a4. It’s interesting, once again, to note that Black has a bishop because 7 Black pawns are on dark squares. And he also has dark-squared bishop. But despite, the only possible way for White to save the game would be if f2-pawn was not there. First, Kf7. Rh1 and Ke6. It’s very patient and very simple and very amazing play by Capablanca. Well, one of the very well-known and very useful principles for successful play in endgames is, first, activate all pieces, even king, and ONLY then, organize some pawn activities on flank or let’s say in centre. So after fully mobilizing his pieces, Kf7-Ke6, Black is ready to organize some attack on queenside. How will it be organized? Well, Rhb8 and b5. if White stops that with c4, then Black can play Ra6-Rb6-Rb4 and then c6 with b5. For instance..Let’s see what happened. h4 and Black simply ignores the King side because White can achieve nothing there. Rfb8. Black can take but not more. And now very interesting..if Rh7, rook cannot do anything. Even if doubles rooks on seventh rank, after Rh7-Rg7-Rh1-Rhh7 still everything is protected. And Black will just play on queenside after b5. If Rh6, no problem. f6 is very well protected. So White can do nothing on h-file. b3, c6, very good move. Black wants to take with cxb5 if White takes on b5. No unnecessary haste. Black calmly prepares b5’s theat. If b5 immediately game will be balanced because White stopped Black’s activities on queenside and Black cannot play c4. So c6 – perfect! White doubled the rooks with Ra2, b5, Rha1. And now, White is ready to stop Black’s activities on a-file. But White of course, is unable to prevent another decisive threat. Black is not interested in taking bxa4 because of Rxa4 with no problems for White. Of course, b4 will be even worse because position will be blocked there. But c4 is decisive threat! What’s the point? Opening the position..opening b-file where soon Black rook will dominate. Black has 2 options Let’s see what happens if dxc4, of course, bxc4, bxc4, simply Rb4. with the idea of Rxc4, Rb8 with completely winning position. White decided to take axb5 and of course, cxb3 – intermediate move! What happens if Rxa5? It’s very interesting and funny. Rxa5, Rxa5 and b2 promoting. Well, after cxb3, White must play cxb3 and now Rxb5. Well, the bishop on g3 and g2-king are mere spectators who can only watch the Black pieces conquering the queenside. As mentioned above, Black simply organized some activities on queenside on opposite flank to White’s paralyzed g3-bishop. Ra4. What else to do! Rxb3, d4. That was White’s last chance trying to open g3-bishop but simply, Black keeps pawn on e5 and defends a5-pawn. Black’s next move can be Bb4 with idea of organize c5 and step-by-step, advancing a-pawn with transferring king even to b5 if necessary. Rc4 and now it’s time – Rb4, exchanging rook or taking d4. White decided not to take took because that will be completely lost for him after Bxb4 and advancing a-pawn. He decided to take on c6, Rxd4. A wonderful game game on theme “How to isolate piece?” – g3-bishop. Here in this game, you can see how to play if opponent has very passive piece on some part of the board and of course how
to avoid arising of some bad piece..desperately bad piece in your camp. Well, everything started with Bg4. Even with earlier White’s mistake Nd5 which allowed Black to focingly to double pawns on f-file. And of course, with presence of White’s so paralyzed bishop on g3 Black has perfect plan to
realize his huge positional advantage. Practically, Black is a piece up. And by playing on queenside, he will have an extra piece there. But stil, very interesting game. Capablanca first played f6, Kf7, Ke6 before any decisive pawn activities. Once again, I want to underline that very instructive principle – do not take any pawn activities even in endgame before fully optimizing all your pieces, including the king. So after including King activation..setting king on e6 and safe place on light square, Black, after Rfb8, prepares everything in his camp and finally, after c6, decisive threat, b5 followed. White simply couldn’t resist and Black having extra piece on queenside, fully dominating there with easily converted that huge positional advantage into full point. I hope you enjoyed that lesson and see you soon with new examples. Bye-bye! 🙂

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