FB Messenger Embedded Apps – Chess

FB Messenger Embedded Apps – Chess


Like to play chess but don’t have time to
sit down to a game with a friend? Facebook may have granted your wish. Let me give you a quick run down of how to play a game with a friend via Facebook Messenger here on OTS Nanobytes. Facebook like to surprise us with new things all the time and this was almost no different except that they didn’t announce this one. They so quietly added the embedded apps to Facebook Messenger that it was almost a month before a Reddit user let the word out by accidentally finding how to turn them on. To see a list of the currently available embedded apps enter the @ sign in a conversation with one of your friends. This can be done from any platform that runs Messenger be it computer, tablet, or smartphone. Once you enter the @ sign you get a pop up showing you what apps are available and it’ll look something like this depending on which platform you’re on. As you can see right now there’s only Chess and DailyCute but there are rumors that more apps are on their way and to be added throughout the year so keep checking back to see what they decide to make. As you can see if you want to just get started enter @fbchess play in the conversation window of the person you want to play against. Then you get a chess board that looks alot like the old Chess Master 2000 program back in Windows 3.1. Let’s scroll back for a second here and take a look at how to move your men. Now this might be new for some players out there who have never been in a chess club or tournaments but Facebook Chess uses Standard Algebraic Notation to make the moves. For those who know what that is they like
just closed this video and went right on to playing the game but for those of you still
here let me explain. See a standard chess board is actually a labeled grid with numbers on the vertical and letters and the horizontal. Any move you make can actually be represented in a written form such as Ph5 which makes this pawn move here. You use P for Pawn, R for Rook, B for Bishop. Q for Queen, K for King and N for Knight since K is already taken up by the King. Now believe it or not odds are you’ve actually heard this type of chess jabber before. Most recent one I can think of is the Sherlock
Holmes movie but when spoken you don’t say all the letter number combinations most of the time and it sounds something like this in example: Bishop takes Knight, Check. King to Rook two. Rook to King’s rook three, Check. Bishop to Rook Three. Bishop takes Bishop. Rook to Bishop Four. Rook takes Rook. Pawn takes Rook. Bishop to Bishop Seven. Queen takes Knight Pawn. Bishop to Bishop Eight, Discover Check and incidentally Mate. Most moves can be made simply by stating the piece you want to move and where but there are a couple of special moves you want to take note of. Let’s say you want to move your Knight from the back row. To do that you have to tell the program that you want to move a knight, which vertical line it’s on and where it’s going. In this example Ngf3 which is Knight on vertical line G to F3. The other important move is the Castle. In
chess as long as the space is clear between them and it is their first move the King and the Rook can Castle to place the King in a safer location. To do that in Facebook chess use the command 0-0-0 or O-O. The rest of the commands are pretty straight forward. Taking an opponent’s piece can be made just like making a move in most cases. For all other moves in Facebook Chess use the @fbchess help command. And that’s Facebook Chess in a nutshell. This has been an OTS Nanobyte. Tech Education and News for your life. Happy Gaming

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