Chess Strategy: Weak Squares Part-2

Chess Strategy: Weak Squares Part-2


Hello everyone! In this video, I will
show you what happened in the game between Aaron Nimzowitsch and Hans Duhm. It’s not a very well-known game but still very instructive and very amazing play by White – Nimzowitsch. He started with c4, e6, e4, c5, Nc3 Nc6 and f4. This is the opening setup after Nf3, d3 will be. And Black answered with d6. Nf3, still White keeps both possibilities – to play Be2, Be3 setup or to switch to some England with g3-Bg2. At the same time, Black wants to play like in closed Sicilian with a knight on d4 and support it with bishop on g7 and other knight to e6. But in that moment, Black chose the wrong move order by playing g6. That’s a bad move. What’s the point? Well, there are red-marks on d6, f6 and h6 squares which are used for potentially weak squares. What’s the point? After playing g6, Black
bishop probably will be placed there on g7. But then d6-pawn will be desperately weak. If Black bishop goes to e7, then there will be weakness on h6-g6 – they will be unnecessary. Black must choose between Be7 and Bg7. Probably by playing g6, he will play Bg7 but then as I said d6-pawn will be in danger. How to use those weaknesses? How can Aron Nimzowitsch choose those weak squares? Well obviously with opening position after d4. Wihout d4, Black will play Bg7, Nd4 and other knight to c6 supporting d4-knight and controlling that hole. So after g6 immediately d4 was perfect
reaction from White and Black did another mistake. Much better move was cxd4 and defending, basically defending after Be7 and Nf6. Bg7 was played, that looks as a natural move but that is a big mistake.Let’s see what happens dxc5, dxc5, Qxd8+, Kxd8 and e5. Perfect move! What’s the point? First, that closes g-bishop making that bishop very bad. Second, c8-bishop stays very bad because e6-pawn is fixed, closing that bishop. Third, that move controls weak squares (d6 and f6) as you can see and fourth, knight comes to e4, not only attacking c5-pawn but also controlling weak squares (d6 and f6). Black answered with h5 – normal move. The good side of that move is that it preventing White’s g4-move and in that way, simply making knight safe on f5 while Black knight goes to h6-f5. And after h5, knight will be safe there. But there is also a bad side of the h5-move. Yes of course, g5-square is desperately weak now and White knight on g5 in future will make very dangerous pressure against f7-pawn and also, there will not be the possibility for Black to attack that knight with a pawn. Be3 and now, there are so many green arrows and green-marks on the board. What’s the point? Well, you will see BAD and GOOD squares and pieces, respectively. In Black’s camp, there are only red ones as you can see, desperately weak rooks on a8 and h8. Very bad and closed bishops on c8 and g7. Also d6, f6 and g5 are weak squares very easily accessible by White pieces especially by knight on e4, in future. White’s both knights, rook on a1, and e3-bishop are very active in that moment. White’s next move is 0-0-0 and rook goes to open file d1. And simply, for a long time there will not be Black rooks in action. White’s f1-bishop can go to d3 and e4 if necessary, pressure on b7 and knight on c6. White’s e3-bishop can not only attack c5, but also can be transferred to f2-h4. Controlling very important diagonal. White’s knights on c3 and f3 soon will dominate on e4 and maybe on b5 and g5 if
necessary. Since that moment, Black can only care about defense with no chances, to say, even a draw with no chances to find any counter-play. In that moment, precise White’s play, game will be almost
over. Black played b6, natural move defending c5, 0-0-0, Ke7 and now, there are a few possibilities for White. Nb5 is one of them intending transferring knight to c7 or d6 but also it can be done with Ne4. Still I think Bf2 is more precise move. What’s the point? White wants to set bishop on h4 before Black knight comes to f5 preventing it. Nb5 and Ne4 will be played later. Now, Bf2 is the right move and after Nh6, Bh4 goes with check. Kf8, and Bd3. Once again, Ne4 will be unreasonable option. Also Nb5 is unreasonable. But still White prefers Bd3, what’s the point? Well, after Bd3, Bb7, Be4 setting strong pressure on that diagonal intending Rd7. Let’s mark it with green. Black has to answer with Na5 and after Na5, Bxb7, Nxb7 White knight can easily go to e4 and there will not be Bb7 which makes threats against White’s knight on e4. Let’s see now. Very passive Black pieces all are in the corners and a8-rook and h8-rook are very passive. b7-knight, g7-bishop only that knight can go to f5 tp some active position but still, that knight cannot help Black to avoid a loss. White rooks will be doubled soon on d-file, knights will occupy b5, e4, g5 for instance. Bishop dominates on that diagonal. Black can already dream about Rd8 and reducing material which will be in his favour. So Black simply cannot exchange his passive pieces for White’s active pieces. White continues with full pressuring. Rd7, Rb8, doubling with Rhd1. What can Black do? He wants to do some regroup after Kg8 maybe with Bf8. I don’t know what Black wanted to do in that position. Maybe best move will be simply resigning. 🙂 What can White do now? So many good plans are there. Rc7 with doubling, Nb5 is another, Ne4 with Nf6 or Bf6 is third option. And Ng5 making pressure on f7 is fourth. White chose to play Ng5. But first he wanted to move bishop. He didn’t like Ng5
immediately because Bishop on h4 will be closed by the knight. First, Be7 and after Black Nf5 now Ng5! Black can take on e7 but there will be benifits only for White. Re7 will be done with tempo. Another rook will come to 7th rank. Black will lose f7-pawn and king will be in danger. Re8 happened and bishop is attacked, so Bf6 happened. What can Black do? f7 is under attack, b7-knight is attacked. Black took, exf6 and now king is in danger. Very sad position for Black. Knight is attacked, pawns are also weak, rooks are very passive, king with no space and no moves and soon White can organize even mate attack if he wants. Same time, all White pieces are very well coordinating. Even c3-knight will soon help other pieces in organizing decisive attack. Na5 happened. And White could take a7 or f7 but still White preferred Rd8. Black must play Kf8..no other possibility to avoid mate. And R1d7! Very simple threat of Rf7 and Re8 with mate in 2. Black must play Nh6. And now soon there will be some tactical shots. So perfectly leading that positional play, Aron Nimzowitsch. He finally got completely winning position. And if you perfectly, strategically lead your game, there must be some tactics solution at the end which will end the battle. Nce4! Even that knight goes to help White’s other pieces. Nc6 and now I will stop for a moment, giving you a few seconds to see brilliant tactics. Aron Nimzowitsch of course, didn’t miss it and won game very effectively. Rxf7+! What to do? Knight must take, Nxe6+, Kg8, Rxe8+, Kh7 and after Ng5+ Black finally resigned. There is mate after Kh6, Nxf7+ and another knight to g5 or Rxh8. Or of course, if Black takes, White plays Nxg5 with Rh8. There was mate in 2 and Black finally resigned. Well, I hope you enjoyed this video. You could see how Black inaccurately advanced pawn to g6, exchanged queens and after h5, he faced huge problems with weak squares d6 and f6. Well, in future, you should patiently play and care about the weak squares. Or avoid creating weak squares if you don’t have enough defenders on them. Black also wasted time for some maneuvers like h5-Nh6-Nf5 and White got space while Black played some inaccurate moves and of course White was better in development, had more space White had more active pieces which easily and effectively exploited weak squares in Black’s camp. I hope you enjoyed this video, and see you soon with new material. 🙂 Bye-bye!

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