Chess Strategy: How to use an open file Part-2

Chess Strategy: How to use an open file Part-2


Hello everyone! 🙂 Let’s see what happened in the game between Evgeny Sveshnikov and Yuri Balashov. Two great experts for French defense. Evgeny Sveshnikov is a real expert for advancing variation of French and Yuri Balashov somehow humiliated him in that game, playing with Black pieces. The game started wtih Sicilian but soon, it converted to French defense and Balashov, after Nc6, Nf3, played Bd7. White answers with dxc5. That move is not good in that move order. Well, if White wants to take dxc5 which was actually invented by Wilhelm Steinitz in the nineteenth century and
later analyzed by, specially Aron Nimzowitsch. Well, if White wants to take dxc5, it should be done with pawn on c2 because then, c3 is not so necessary move. So using c3, wasting time, Black just gets comfortable position in that line. After
Nge7 Black’s idea is clear attacking potentially weak pawn on e5 which is exposed to
attack after Ng6, Qc7 and with or without even f6 later. White played precise move – castling. Well, Bf4, Ng6, Bg3, Qc7, Qe2 was normal for both sides and that will lead to unclear game. After castling, Black has the
perfect possibility of Ng6. Now Bf4 is forbidden and Black must defend
that pawn twice with rook and queen but of course that is not so advisable to
use major pieces to defend a pawn but still Qe2 was better choice in that
moment. Black will answer with castling maybe with f6 later, maybe with a5 stopping White’s b4 although of course b4 is not so dangerous for
Black. But instead of Qe2, White took on g6. That’s very big positional mistake and I still wonder how
Evgeny Sveshnikov decided to play that poor move. Now I suggest you to pause the video and decide what to do for Black – fxg6 or hxg6? of course, you should make that decision based on better file for you. Is f-file more promising or h-file?
Which can be accessed with your rooks? Now I will explain what happened. hxg6 will not bring so much to black because rook can be used on h-file but problem is that
other black pieces cannot easily attack h2 and only one rook cannot harm White’s pawn structure in front of king. fxg6 is much better and f-file will bring a lot to Black. Let’s see what happened. Bf4. If Be3, of course for a moment Black will keep bishop and potentially White bishop on e3 will still be on the board. Now there will be problems with d4. Black cannot defend that with Bd4. To strengthen e5-pawn but
then black will organize his attack on kingside without problems. White answered Bf4 and after caslting, Bg3. Well, if White wanted to the defend that pawn on e5 and transfer bishop to g3, he should do it immediately, not after Bg6 actually. Instead of castling in move no.8, White should go for Bf4-Bg3 as already stated above. After Bg3, let’s make conclusions. White’s knight on f3 and g3-bishop are paralyzed by White’s e5 pawn. Actually it would be better for White
if that pawn does not exist. So that knight and that bishop must protect the pawn and
both of those pieces are restricted. At the same time all Black pieces are very active. Just see wonderful bishop on c5 targeting f2 and even maybe stronger bishop on d7
potentially stronger, that bishop can be easily transferred to g6, h5, b5 or
even a4 if necessary So Black played Ne7. What’s the idea? Black wants to
organize attack on kingisde. Usually if you have bishop pair and if opponent have bishop and knight, it’s always good to surpass on opponent bishop collar. So in that example, Black wants to
play h6, g5 restricting further bishop and knight, taking under control,
even squares f4 and h4. Then after probably Nf5 or maybe even Ng6 putting
pressure on kingside. Bishop can be transferred to e8-g6-h5 and of course finally, Black can double rooks on f-file. So simply by eliminating g6-pawn, by moving it to g5, both bishop and knight will be open, will have space g6 under their control.
Nbd2, Nf5 first. Bishop on g3 is weak and now Nf5 prevents h4. After Black’s h6 now, maybe h4 can prevent g5. So first Nf5 prevents, of course, if h4, Nxg3 takes a piece. Nb3 and now perfect move – Ba4. Temporarily pinning knight but soon White will have great problems with that
knight. Well, White answered with Kh1, moving king from that dangerous diagonal. But Qb6. Not only targetting f2, but also attacking knight on b3. So queen cannot avoid that annoying pin with Qd2 because pawn is lost. Bxb3, axb3 and Qxb3. Qc2 defending both f2 and b3. And now simply Rac8. h6 is another option. Then maybe Rf7, Raf8 but Rac8 is also good. Re2 – white starts organized better defense..defending f2, Black just follows his plan – h6, h3 pf course Black can take Nxg3 but then g6-pawn will be in danger so Black simply didn’t want to exchange that perfect knight for that poor bishop in that occasion. Bh2 – that was the idea of White. Moving bishop to g1 maybe, regrouping Nh2 or somewhere else and f3 exchaning somehow h2-bishop for c5-bishop. Rc7, not only doubling on c-file but also doubling on f-file (Rcf7) – solid move. Ne1. Now Black missed the possibility to play, maybe, d4, opening the position which is in general in his favour having two bishops. c4 and d3 can come. If Nxd3 that can be fatal after ND4 or after Qxd3, Bxf2. But still Black didn’t want to activate White’s pieces. For instance now White can
play Bg1 in some moment exchaning that bishop. Or maybe c5 exchanging bishop that way. So Black just wanted to keep pressure on White’s position because Black has more space, perfect bishop pair and active pieces and simplification,
generally, is not in his favor. Be7, you will see the plan. Rc4 – perfect! Well, rook from there also controls fourth rank. And it can be easily transferred to Kingside making huge
threats to White king. Rd2. Looks like White was afraid of d4 and White wants to prevent that but Black has completely new idea. Just see pawn on f2. Both Black queen and f8-rook are targeting that pawn and e1-knight closes first rank. Maybe Black rook can reach f1 in some moment with dangerous threats. Yes, you guess! What Black can do? Ne3, but problem is that after simply Qe2, knight must retreat back. Of course, White will not take fxe3 because after that, Black wins. Nf3 must follow and then Rxd1 with easy win. As already stated earilier, Ne3 will be met with Qe2 and knight must go back. Well, Black has perfect possibility – g4! g5-pawn disappears so even Black bishop will dominate that diagonal e7-h4 and pawn on h3 also disappears weakening White King pawn-shield. White takes and now after Ne3 Black got something. fxe3 is impossible because of that. Once again Black will take White Queen but after Ne3, White must play Qe2. But now Ng4 is possible! Black got a lot. f3 and Nxh2. What can White do? If Kxh2, simply Rh4+ and rook is protected, and Qg1 is fatal for White. With so many threats for instance Rh3 with mate is one of them. Rh3+ Kxh3, Qh1+ and Qh4# What a mate! Bc5. After Nh2, Nd4, and now Bb5 was better with very dangerous threat of Rd4 but but that was missed by Balashov who played Bc5 in that moment. Also very good move..White finally takes knight and now Black converts his positional advantage to
material advantage. White started to organize something with Rc1. but of course d4-rook is more available than d2-rook. And Black keeps that rook. Bb5, attacking queen. Queen must go somewhere. Now King cannot go to f2 and Black uses that to play Qd8. Qg5 – very dangerous threat. White tried to organize something with Qe3 but mow d4, once again White Queen is forced to go back but if queen goes back, Qg5 decides the battle. After Rcd1 with idea to take d8-queen after dxe3 simply Rhf4! There is the idea of Qh4#, to take White queen on e3 White is forced to take, after that Qg5 follows and White resigns! Simply, after Ke4 Qe3 mates. You could see in that absolutely brilliant game how Black uses
bishop pair and especially how Black perfectly decided and sensed about f-file. Well, fxg6 was the key move in that game. After fxg6, White faced huge problems with unstable knight on f3, unstable pawn on f2 and huge pressure on f-file. Rook on f8 supported by two bishops and a knight. Simply demolished White’s king shield. Of course, Bf4 should be played earlier in that moment instead of castling. Bf4 so that is very instructive game for all players who want to learn how to play correctly and
properly that variation of French defense, advanced variation. Bxg6 and fxg6 was very remarkable moment for entire chess history. I hope you learned a lot from that
game, hope you enjoyed that game. You could see Black bishop pair in action. You should see concrete decision – f-file could bring much more than h-file to Black and you could see finally how
desperately White’s pieces was placed, especially b3-knight and g3-bishop casued so many problems for White. At the same time, Black pieces not only were all active but also cooperated perfectly and Black simply without special efforts, humiliated White in that game. Once again, kind regards, and see you see with new material. Bye-bye!:)

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