Chess Piece – Fusion 360 MiniProject – ISLT 4310/7310

Chess Piece – Fusion 360 MiniProject – ISLT 4310/7310


>>Hi, and welcome to
this Fusion 360 tutorial. In this video, we are particularly
going to be looking at mini project one for Mizzou
class ISLT 4310 and 7310. mini project one for Mizzou
class ISLT 4310 and 7310. In this mini project in particular, we’re going to be taking a look
at how to make a chess piece or more specifically, a chess pawn. After you open up Fusion 360, you will see that it is all
ready automatically generated a new blank document
for you labeled untitled in the top left corner
where your tabs are. To start out, we need to make a sketch. You go up to your sketch toolbar. You can hit the create sketch button or go through the dropdown
menu to hit create sketch. Select one of your planes. I’m going to choose one
of the vertical ones because it makes more sense to me. Feel free to choose whatever plane. Starting off, we need to
make a center line that we’re going to design the rest
of the chess piece off of. This center line is important
because in this tutorial we’re going to mainly
use the revolve function to generate the main
structure of our chess pawn. It’s a good idea to place
your first point at the origin just because that is a sure fire way to know where your line is
and where it’s starting. Right now, we don’t really
care about the dimensions. We do care that the line
is perfectly vertical, or where you see the little bar in the top right says 90 degrees. That’s what we care about. Then you’re just gonna go ahead and start sketching the rest of your pawn. I know I’m gonna add a
circle here at the top layer. I’m just going to draw a
pretty basic pawn shape. Go back and connect your
line all the way through. You’ll notice that the sketch profile turned a different color. This is to help you know that
your sketch is a closed loop. One thing I do want to
point out real quick is, if you notice this line
right here, if we zoom in it does not perfectly
fit at the horizontal. We’re gonna need to fix this to make sure our chess piece can lay flat on tables. In order to do that you should hit escape, because you’re still
technically in the line tool, click on the line that you want to edit. In our case, this is the bottom one because it’s not perfectly horizontal. To ensure that it is perfectly horizontal, we will go over to the sketch
pallet into your right. This is an automatic popup
window that will appear whenever you are in the sketch
command and drawing lines. If you go down, we have
look at sketch grid. Constraints is what we want. Keep going down, there’s a
horizontal/vertical setting and then there’s a little
button to the right. You’ll want to click that. What this button does is it
will adjust and lock that line into the position it is
more closely related to. That’s our sketch profile. I did say I wanted to add a circle. Going back over to sketch,
scrolling down to circle, or just hovering down to circle rather, and over to center diameter circle. One thing we do need to
do to our sketch though before we go into making it a 3D object is we need to segregate the circle. The reason we need to do that is because of the feature
we’re using, revolve. Revolve will only work if you have lines that won’t end up intersecting. Because we have a circle, if we decided to rotate that 360 degrees, we’d actually end up with
a circle on top of a circle and that’s no good for this program. You need to separate
it into a half circle. Select the top of your midline and go up. You’ll notice a small light blue x on the top of the circle line. That means that it’s an intersect. Now our sketch profile
actually is complete. We’ll hit stop sketch. We’re done with the sketching now. We need to add some sort of mass to this so we need to go over to the create tab. Like I said, we’re looking
for the revolve tool for this Fusion 360 mini project. When you click revolve, it
will ask for two main things: profile and, in this little popup menu, you’ll notice that there is profile and then a blue highlighted select region. That means we are
currently selecting regions for our revolve. Go ahead and select all the regions that would make up the
half profile of our chess. The next step is axis. In order to tell Fusion 360 that you’re now looking
at selecting an axis, you need to click this
grayed out select button. Once you click it, it’ll become blue and it’ll let you select an axis. Go ahead and select your midplane line. It will always try to
remember what you did last. It says that we want 15 degrees. We don’t actually want that so you need to make sure you
change this number to 360. Then, you’ll auto populate a profile, or a preview, of your revolve. As you can see in this grayed area. If we go over to the top right corner and hit the little home button, this just brings us to a slanted view so we get a better idea of our object. It’s helpful to see the preview and make sure that everything is correct. Since this does in fact look correct, we’ll go ahead and hit okay. This is your first chess
piece, congratulations. Now if you’re a part of the class, this is the time that you need to go ahead and save the model. We’ll go up to the top left, file, save, name it following the
details listed on Canvas, and then also this is
a good time to go ahead and save, or export it, as an stl file. The window that pops up for
you might be a little different depending on which programs
you have downloaded. The important part is is that you can only select one body at a time and, on this output region down
near the bottom of that window, you need to deselect
send to 3D print utility. This way, you know
exactly what’s happening and it’s saving it as an stl file. It’s not gonna try to open
any other programs on you. It just saves your file. You’ll select which body you
want to do and then hit okay. Then save it wherever you
need to on your computer. I won’t actually be
saving it to my computer because I’m just keeping
the Fusion 360 file which you also will need to share. Anyways, let’s get back onto the tutorial. This is a pretty basic
shape of a chess pawn. I’m clicking the scroll wheel and holding down shift at the same time so I can rotate it
around the center point. Let’s go ahead and try and make a little bit more unique pawn. We’re just going to be
hiding our previous pawn and we’re going to make a new sketch. Because we rotated, you see it’s not in a very convenient way to select things so a quick idea is to go
ahead and hit the home button and then it will take
you back to this screen, which is the original screen you saw when you first hit sketch. Go ahead and select the same
plane or different plane, it doesn’t really matter,
and then draw another pawn. Again, starting off with your
center line at the origin and making sure that it is
a perfectly vertical line. Hit escape to no longer
be using the line tool and then add whatever features you want. I’m gonna go ahead and
use a two point rectangle to make the base of my chess piece. I do like the idea of a circle, but we’re gonna do more
of a diamond shape. Remember what I said about the circle. We want to make sure that we have all of our regions
bisected by our midplane. I’m gonna go ahead and add another line in the middle of my diamond. It’s okay that the right side doesn’t look exactly like the left side because I’m gonna be
choosing the left side to revolve around, so the
right side doesn’t matter. I want to try and do
something more unique. I’m going to use the spline tool, which allows you to create
more of a curved contour rather than perfectly straight line. Unlike the line tool, the spline tool won’t automatically close. Go ahead and click this
check mark over to one side and then that will
complete your line for it. It’s looking pretty cool, but I don’t think I want
just one solid piece. We’re going to go ahead
and add some more depth to make this like a shelled region. Now we’re going to stop sketching because I’m going to add
my mass to my chess pawn. One thing in particular that
I am going to do differently is that, still using the revolve tool, but this time I’m only going to select the two profiles at the very top and then the profile for the base. For the axis, again, this
is still just our midplane. 360 degree rotation because I do want it to go around the whole object. That’s not something remotely chess pawny or 3D printable because we
have this weird flying object and then just our base. But you notice our sketch
will have disappeared. We want to use that sketch to add more geometry to this part. In order to see it again, you
need to go over to the browser in the left, right under
model and sketch tools. You’ll notice that some of
these things have light bulbs that are yellow and some that are blue. Blue means off, yellow means on. If you click the dropdown
menu for sketches, you’ll notice that sketch
two, the sketch we just did, has the light bulb off. We want to turn that on so that way, when we go ahead and add
more mass to the sketch, it’s actually able for
us to select the profile. We’re going to go ahead
and do another revolve, but this time instead of do the full 360, we’re going to do a very
small angle and do, say, 15. We want to make sure that
the operation says join. That will connect our parts
into one cohesive piece, rather than trying to cut out a region or making a new body entirely. You’ll notice that the
sketch is still visible and it didn’t automatically disappear. It’s because we manually turned it on so we will also have to
manually turn it off. Still not really 3D printable and still not very looking
like a pawn, at least to me. One last touch we’re gonna add is we’re gonna go ahead and add a pattern. In particular, we’re
going to add a circular. At the pattern type, you want to make sure currently it’s selected as features. This means something that we’ve added to a body would be what we wrote. In the objects, because we
do need to select a feature, we need to go down to the history bar and select the revolve we just did. When you hover over an object, it should also highlight
whatever you just did. That way, you can see which feature you’re actually selecting. For the axis, we now need
to select the y axis, or the vertical one, to make
sure we’re rotating around the same point that the
rest of our revolve. You can change it’s quantity. I think three’s not enough
so we’re gonna go with six. If you were following along
and make your own pawn, now would also be a great
time to save the file and export another stl. If you are a part of
the 4310 or 7310 class, you will need to make some alterations. What are these alterations? Well, you need to make a
chess pawn that is your own. Don’t copy anything exactly
the way that I did it and make sure you have a unique piece. You’ll need to point out which
things you added or changed in the small written report
that you turn in on Canvas. For some inspiration, I’ve
made a couple different chess pieces to show you what you can do. This one, I added multiple holes in our original sketch
profile and revolved it. This piece right here, I actually used revolve
on these small extenders but on the main arms I just
did a regular extrusion and that’s why it’s not perfectly
connected to the cylinder. Hopefully this gives you some ideas to make your own chess pieces and pawns. Let me know as your suggestion
for other mini projects unrelated to the class
down in the comments. Thanks for watching this video. Feel free to like, subscribe
or comment down below.

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