Beginning Chess Lessons: Part 4 : How to Spot the Slav Defense in a Chess Game

Beginning Chess Lessons: Part 4 : How to Spot the Slav Defense in a Chess Game


The next defense to Pawn to Queen’s four that
I’d like to show you is the Slav defense. And the Slav defense, presumably named because
it was played by Slavic Masters, is again, extremely popular and may in fact right now
be the most common response to Pawn to Queen’s four. And it goes like this basically. The
Pawn is brought out to Bishop’s three. And so you’ll notice it is somewhat similar to
the King’s Indian, which was played on the other side of the board, of course. But the
big advantage here is that it does give black a bit more mobility in the center. And so
the typical continuation would be that white would again play Pawn to Queen’s Bishop four.
And at this stage, various ways for black to go. Probably these days this is as popular
a response as any. The Pawn to King’s four. But what is the significant factor about the
Slav defense, and what is worth looking at if you are interested in this, is that it
is signified by this Pawn to Bishop’s three opening. Pawn to Queen’s Bishop three. And
as a result of that, it does give black a lot more center potential.

One thought on “Beginning Chess Lessons: Part 4 : How to Spot the Slav Defense in a Chess Game

  1. the next move at 1:00 can resault you a check mate! move the queen to E4! hey …..you give us lessons?:) …well probably you'd overlooked.

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