Beginning Chess Lessons: Part 3 : Chess Game Terms

Beginning Chess Lessons: Part 3 : Chess Game Terms


Now I’d like to go into a few chess terms
that you may hear from time to time. You will hear people talking about a Fianchetto, or
Fianchetto. It is simply means a Bishop which is on that Knight’s two square. That is a
Fianchetto Bishop. If you remember, it controls a long diagonal which is very powerful. You
will also hear about discovered check. Discovered check, in essence, is something like this.
You would have this situation and the King is not, the white King is not currently in
check, but now the Knight moves and low and behold, the King is now in check. That’s discovered
check. There is also something called double check. And double check would essentially
work like this. Where you would be simultaneously attacked by two different pieces, in essence,
your King. So a double check could be something like this. At the moment, white is not in
check. Black to move. Black moves to here. Now the white King is in double check. It’s
checked both by the Bishop here and by the Rook here. That is double check. Another thing
that I wanted to talk about is the term called En Prise, another term you’ll hear used from
time to time, which is simply a piece which is being attacked, which for whatever reason
is not moved. Now the black Rook there is being attacked by the white Bishop. The black
Rook is En Prise, the French phrase again meaning, being basically, being under danger.
And unless it’s moved, of course, it could be lost. But that is an En Prise, the Rook
is En Prise there. Now I’d like to tell you a little bit about blindfold chess. Blindfold
chess is exactly what it says, it is chess played without actually seeing the board.
And Master Chess Players are very, very good at this. They can actually play several games
at the same time blindfold, without ever seeing the board and most likely they’ll win. And
final thing is a Master is somebody, a Chess Master, who has a very high chess rating.
There is a rating system. Usually a Master would be twenty four hundred and above.

3 thoughts on “Beginning Chess Lessons: Part 3 : Chess Game Terms

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *